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DAREarts Webequie Youth release their ‘Anishinaabe Dreams’ music video!

“My dreams are brighter than the moon and stars.”

DAREarts is honoured to release ‘Anishinaabe Dreams’ by DAREarts Webequie First Nation youth. Please like and share to help their voices be heard!

As part of DAREarts’ year-long ‘Spirit Bear’ project, DAREarts is proud to release ‘Anishinaabe Dreams’. It is a powerful music video that shares the dreams of Indigenous youth everywhere! Through their own voices, the song and video is a testament to the connections that Webequie First Nation youth feel to their history and culture, and the pride they have in their ancestry.

As DAREarts’ ‘Spirit Bear’ journeyed through four remote communities, the youth in each community transformed it into a metaphor for the circle between culture, history and youth. As they moved from creating their own stories of change, through the need to take care of each other, to taking pride and finding strength, they also recognized that they are Spirit Bear. By honouring the past, they are the future: stronger together.
“We are strong, we are fearless, we are one, we are proud, we are ‘nishinaabe”

A project of the DAREarts Indigenous Program, the Spirit Bear project was undertaken through a collaborative partnership with Stratford Festival, the First Nations of Webequie, Marten Falls, Attawapiskat and Neskantaga, and with lead support from Northbridge Insurance, ONT150, Noront Resources, and Allan Drive Middle School.”

-posted with permission from DAREarts
Read DAREarts’ profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

What Is A DARE? What Do You Think?

Special thanks to DAREarts for sharing this piece with ArtBridges. For more information on DAREarts, please visit DAREarts.com 

Written by DAREarts artist-educator Glenn Marais.

What Is A DARE? What Do You Think?

What is a Dare? It’s a challenge, a risk, a step into the unknown that requires courage and determination. To take a DARE on is to embrace discipline, action, respect, and excellence. These four tenants are the cornerstones of DAREarts, an arts and leadership program that takes children and youth from marginalized communities and gives them an opportunity to become leaders by developing belief in themselves.

How do they do this? DARE challenges you to uphold these principles of character with one hundred percent consistency in all activities and interactions throughout their programming. Whether it is the 10 week, All the Arts Program or their ground breaking First Roots program that works with First Nations youth in the north, DAREarts’ artist educators, teachers and teaching assistants embrace founder Marilyn Fields credo of responsible leadership through action. We live the DARE principles in how we treat each other, how we treat our students and our communities.

DAREarts changes lives and saves lives for youth who come with stories that read like the most incredible fiction only they are all too real. They are often painful, sometimes tragic and always inspiring. When students stand tall at the annual DAREarts leadership awards and tell their stories to a captivated audience, they are stirring, riveting and emotional accounts of their journey from lost, confused, angry youth to motivated, inspired and determined leaders, ready to take the DARE principles out into the world and change it for the better.

DAREarts is possibly the most important youth program running in the country right now. This is no understatement. Too often we throw our troubled youth into a convenient container of hyperbole and bias and assign the blame to society and yet offer no way out. In a world that favors the few, DARE serves the many and brings forth youth leaders that will revolutionize the way we look at youth education through the arts. Visit DAREarts at www.darearts.com and join our team. Make a donation, share our website and help us tell the kids’ story.

Help them change the world.

Glenn Marais

DAREarts Artist-Educator
Music in Mind”

-posted with permission from DAREarts
Read DAREarts’ profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Newsletter: Video Resources / Des ressources vidéos

If you haven’t seen ArtBridges’ latest newsletter yet, have a look! This edition was compiled by Lisa Tran, ArtBridges’ Content Coordinator:

The ArtBridges Learning and Resources section includes toolkits, research, and reflections from community-engaged arts initiatives across Canada. In our Resource & Tools section, we also have video resources from the field. In this newsletter, we share a few video highlights from the section that are toolkits and talks. Visit our Resource section to watch more! Happy New Year!

Read ArtBridges’ full latest newsletter here.

Des ressources vidéos

La section Formation et ressources de ToileDesArts propose des outils, des recherches et des réflexions issus du milieu de l’art communautaire un peu partout au Canada. Dans cette infolettre, nous mettons de l’avant certaines vidéos qui présentent des outils et des entretiens pertinents. Visitez la sous-section « Portail de ressources » pour en voir plus ! Bonne année !

Lire la suite : Infolettre : Des ressources vidéos

Resource Highlight | Art and Wellness: The Importance of Art

Art and Wellness: The Importance of Art for Aboriginal Peoples’ Health and Healing
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health | Canada wide | 2012
Alice Muirhead, Sarah de Leeuw

“Addressing the vast health inequalities that exist between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples in Canada requires solutions that are as complex as the problems themselves. This fact sheet details the ways in which art, and more broadly, creative processes, can, and are being used, to address the root causes of ill-health, the experience of disease, clinical symptoms, and the ways and means through which Aboriginal peoples interact with health care systems.”

Click on the ArtBridges Resource Portal listing for more details and to read the document.

Resource Highlight | Returning Home Through Stories: A Decolonizing Approach to Omushkego Cree Theatre through the Methodological Practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC)

Returning Home Through Stories: A Decolonizing Approach to Omushkego Cree Theatre through the Methodological Practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC)
University of Toronto, T-Space | ON | 2010
Candace Brunette

“This research examines Native Performance Culture (NPC), a unique practice in Native theatre that returns Aboriginal people to the sources of Aboriginal knowledge, and interrupts the colonial fragmenting processes. By looking at the experiences of six collaborators involved in a specific art project, the artist-researcher shares her journey of healing through the arts, while interweaving the voices of artistic collaborators Monique Mojica, Floyd Favel, and Erika Iserhoff. This study takes a decolonizing framework, and places NPC as a form of Indigenous research while illuminating the methodological discourses of NPC, which are rooted in an inter-dialogue between self-in-relation to family, community, land, and embodied legacies. Finally, this research looks at the ways that artists work with Aboriginal communities and with Aboriginal knowledge, and makes recommendations to improve collaborative approaches.”

Click on the ArtBridges Resource Portal listing for more details.

Conseils et outils de la ToileDesArts no 7 : Des espaces en ville pour l’art autochtone

(Artistes) Aura et Chief Lady Bird offrent leurs réflexions et leurs trucs à propos de la création de murales communautaires visant à susciter le dialogue, l’expression personnelle et la guérison. Elles collaborent souvent avec des écoles et des organismes tant dans des communautés autochtones que des milieux non autochtones, au centre-ville et dans la grande région de Toronto. Megan Feheley, la coordonnatrice Art communautaire autochtone de ToileDesArts, les a rencontrées par Skype.

Artiste Anishinaabe (Potawatomi et Chippewa) de la Première nation de Rama, Chief Lady Bird est aussi liée, de par son père, à la Première nation de Moose Deer Point. Elle a grandi dans une réserve et vit maintenant à Tkaronto (Toronto). Son travail prend racine dans son expérience de femme autochtone, à la croisée d’une critique du nationalisme et d’une revalorisation de l’identité autochtone ; l’imagerie qui en découle bouscule le regard qu’on porte souvent sur les Premières Nations et leur redonne du pouvoir. Chief Lady Bird réalise des murales collaboratives qui plongent pour un instant les spectateurs dans la vision du monde autochtone afin d’entamer un dialogue essentiel à la restitution des identités culturelles des Premières Nations dans un pays qui n’a jamais reconnu leur valeur.

L’artiste Haudenosaunee (Oneida) Aura (Monique Bedard) a passé son enfance dans une petite ville du sud de l’Ontario. Se consacrant avec passion aux arts visuels depuis 13 ans, elle les a étudiés officiellement à partir de 2006 : pendant trois ans au Fanshawe College de London, en Ontario, puis à l’université de Lethbridge, en Alberta. Ayant obtenu son baccalauréat en Beaux-Arts (Studio Art) en 2010, elle est retournée en Ontario pour enseigner les arts plastiques à des groupes d’enfants, d’adolescents et d’adultes. Artiste, animatrice d’ateliers et muraliste, Monique vit maintenant à Tkaronto (Toronto).

Voici un extrait de l’article:

CONVERSATION AVEC LES ARTISTES CHIEF LADY BIRD ET AURA

“Megan : Quand vous faites des murales avec les jeunes autochtones en contexte urbain, comment composez-vous avec leurs difficultés particulières ? Quel genre de soutien leur offrez-vous ?

Chief Lady Bird : Je pense qu’un des gros problèmes, c’est la déconnexion. Beaucoup des jeunes avec lesquels on travaille, ici à Toronto, n’ont pas nécessairement grandi dans leur communauté. Certains ne font que commencer à découvrir leurs origines. La colonisation, avec ses multiples facettes, a engendré toute une série de déconnexions qui ont fait beaucoup de mal à notre peuple.

Quand on voit des jeunes qui sont confrontés à ça, on leur en parle, on leur indique les ressources. On leur dit que c’est correct de ne pas savoir d’où ils viennent, que c’est un cheminement, qu’il y a des gens qui peuvent les aider à voir plus clair dans tout ça. Ici, en ville, les jeunes vivent des problématiques encore plus complexes comme l’itinérance, la toxicomanie et l’alcoolisme, et le suicide, qui prend beaucoup de place en ce moment. La déconnexion empire tout ça. C’est pourquoi il est nécessaire qu’il y ait des espaces de confiance pour que les jeunes puissent exprimer leur vérité, leur vécu, pour les aider à démêler tout ça.

Aura : Une des choses qui me passionnent, c’est de participer à des projets dans lesquels ce sont les jeunes qui ont le pouvoir de décider. Ça m’inspire tellement de travailler avec les adolescents : ils sont tellement honnêtes, intenses et vulnérables – ça m’incite à montrer davantage ma propre vulnérabilité. C’est grâce aux jeunes que je n’ai plus peur de le faire, et je vois à quel point c’est important d’être vraie et de bâtir ces liens avec eux. En quelque sorte, on travaille à réparer la déconnexion, à refaire la connexion, ensemble. Mon objectif est d’offrir un espace permanent pour explorer cette avenue.”

Conseils et outils de la ToileDesArts no 7 : Des espaces en ville pour l’art autochtone

La série 2017 d’ArtBridges/ToileDesArts a été réalisée grâce au soutien financier de la Fondation Trillium de l’Ontario et traduite en français grâce au programme d’appui à l’interprétation et à la traduction du ministère du Patrimoine canadien.

Pour plus de ressources et outils GRATUITS comme celui-ci, consultez  www.artbridges.ca/learning/learning_resources

crédit : Chief Lady Bird et Aura

ArtTransforms Series Final Episode: Art’s Impact

SKETCH and their partners at TraffikGroup are proud to launch their web series #ArtTransforms: 90-second video vignettes in which young people reveal their own personal Art Transforms story. The series covers themes like mental health, inclusion, entrepreneurship, and more. Young people share how engaging in the arts at SKETCH has sparked their own personal and artistic transformation.”

“If art has transformed your life, share our Final Episode: Art’s Impact. Join these five Toronto Cultural Influencers to support SKETCH, where young people create a new world for themselves and a better future for us all.

To view the other Art Transforms videos and/or to make a donation, visit sketch.ca/arttransforms.

We’re inspired by the stories of young people using art to transform their lives and communities. On any given night in Toronto, about 2,000 young people are homeless. For over 20 years, SKETCH has been advocating that access to the arts is a potent response to this crisis. Make an impact on young people’s creative capacity today. Your response means more youth living homeless or in poverty will find health, inspiration, and voice through the arts.

SKETCH would like to give a final thank you to our video co-producers: Agency: TraffikGroup | Photographer: Sandy Nicholson | Photography Production: FUZE Reps | Editing: Panic and Bob | Visual Effects: The Vanity | Music: Boombox Sound | Makeup: Plutino Group”

Click SKETCH’s playlist to view past #ArtTransforms videos in the series.

-from SKETCH
Read SKETCH’s profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Resource Highlight | Transformative Community Art: Re-visioning the Field of Practice

Transformative Community Art: Re-visioning the Field of Practice
University of Toronto, T-Space | ON | 2011
Catherine Anne McLeod

“Community art is a multidisciplinary practice that was engendered by two main perspectives on art; a functionalist approach and an ‘art as essential to humanity’ approach. These differing ideological positions led to the construction of polarizing dichotomies that divided the field of practice and stagnated the community art discourse. This thesis re-visions community art as transformative community art (T.C.A.) to integrate a diverse range of practice into a distinct, recognizable field, transcend the binaries inherited from its founding fields, and identify the field as an innovative artistic movement and radical practice for social change. In this thesis T.C.A. is employed as a framework for theorizing practice. Threats to T.C.A. from funding structures, cooptation, and institutionalisation are explored and strategies of resistance identified. The concept of T.C.A. is mobilized to identify areas for future work; raising questions and ideas that can contribute to advancing a more complex, nuanced, and productive discourse.”

Click on the ArtBridges Resource Portal listing for more details.

ArtTransforms Series Episode 4: Art Impassions

SKETCH and their partners at TraffikGroup are proud to launch their web series #ArtTransforms: six 90-second video vignettes in which young people reveal their own personal Art Transforms story. The series covers themes like mental health, inclusion, entrepreneurship, and more. Young people share how engaging in the arts at SKETCH has sparked their own personal and artistic transformation.”

“Oddane released his debut album ‘From Yard to Foreign’ in July 2017. In addition to his blossoming music career, He currently works as a youth worker at a local Toronto shelter, and is working on his second album.

On any given night in Toronto, about 2,000 young people are homeless (about 6000 on any night across Canada). For over 20 years, SKETCH has been advocating that access to the arts is a potent response. Through Oddane’s story, we are inspired and compelled to develop more opportunities in the arts for young people to live well and lead in reshaping our communities.

Support the 800 youth that come to SKETCH every year to build their skill base, get access to healthy meals, and become entrepreneurs.

Donate at sketch.ca/donate today. Share Oddane’s story, Art Impassions, and sign up for more stories at bit.ly/NextArtTransformsEpisode.”

Click SKETCH’s playlist to view past #ArtTransforms videos in the series.

-from SKETCH
Read SKETCH’s profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

ArtTransforms Series Episode 3: Art Inspires

SKETCH and their partners at TraffikGroup are proud to launch their web series #ArtTransforms: six 90-second video vignettes in which young people reveal their own personal Art Transforms story. The series covers themes like mental health, inclusion, entrepreneurship, and more. Young people share how engaging in the arts at SKETCH has sparked their own personal and artistic transformation.”

“On any given night in Toronto, about 2,000 young people are homeless (about 6000 on any night across Canada). For over 20 years, SKETCH has been advocating that access to the arts is a potent response. Through Skratch’s story, we are inspired and compelled to develop more opportunities in the arts for young people to live well and lead in reshaping our communities.

Skratch is a grafitti/aerosole artist. His art is inspired by traditional native art, and graffiti style.

Follow Skratch:
Facebook: @skratch.wonder
Instagram: @skratchwonder

Make an impact on young people’s creative capacity today.

Share Skratch’s story, Art Inspires, and sign up for more stories down below.

Your response means more youth living homeless or in poverty will find health, inspiration, and voice through the arts.

Click bit.ly/ArtTransformsSeries to view past #ArtTransforms videos in the series.”

-from SKETCH
Read SKETCH’s profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map