Accessibility:   A A


Posts Tagged ‘art for social change’

Resource Highlight | Toward Training: The Meanings and Practices of Social Change Work in the Arts

Toward Training: The Meanings and Practices of Social Change Work in the Arts
Judith Marcuse and Yael Harlap | International Centre of Art for Social Change | British Columbia | 2006

“This study is motivated by Canadian choreographer and producer Judith Marcuse’s desire to develop opportunities for artists to learn to put their arts practice toward making meaningful change in society. Increasingly, practitioners working in the domain of arts and social change, usually artists who engage in art making in collaboration with communities, have noted the need for solid training as the field expands.

Partnerships between communities and artists—never forgetting that artists are members of communities—are delicate. Collaborative relationships can fail. Conflicts can arise. Projects can fall apart. Community engagement in the arts can reveal rifts that were hidden from view. Marginalized communities, often the sites for arts and social change work, have a history of being manipulated as pawns in political games that do not benefit them.
The potential for damage is great, and this means that artists need to be, at the least, informed, ethical, critical, and reflective.”

Click on the ArtBridges Resource Portal listing for more details.

 

Highlights of ArtBridges’ Site Visits in Montreal 2/3

Last June, ArtBridges/ToiledesArts’s Project Director, Seanna Connell and Francophone Community Arts Coordinator, Catherine Lamaison, spent a week in Montréal to visit and meet 19 community partners and learn about the work that they do on the ground. While most of the ArtBridges/ToiledesArts’ team’s work is done online or over the phone from our Toronto office, getting a chance to travel, see community arts program in action and finally meet partners in person is always highly inspiring and gives all the meaning to our work.

We’ve decided to dedicate a series of three blog posts to the amazing community arts and arts for social change initiatives we’ve discovered in Montréal. Check out yesterday’s post to read about the beginning of our site visits trip!

Wednesday, June 22nd
On our third day we separated in order to visit more community partners. While Seanna explored more art hives (La Ruche St Henri and Le Milieu) and met with Marilyn Lajeunesse, Educational program officer at the Musee des Beaux Arts, Catherine met with Emily Laliberté from Funambules Media and later on with Joel Naggar, intervention coordinator, who gave her a tour of the famous Day Centre for homeless youth Dans La Rue. We met for lunch in the middle–with Esther Filion from Rouage and Seanna ended the day with a meeting with Chad Lubelsky at the J. W. McConnell Family Foundation.

Since 2008 the Funambules Medias Team has worked towards social change by providing marginalized and at-risk populations, mostly youth, with media training and material for them to create, to express themselves and to reflect on systemic causes leading to the criminalization of youth. Funambules Medias also offers production and broadcast services.  Every summer, they organize the Festival de Films Sous les Etoiles, a big outdoor and free film festival in Montréal parks. This event is very popular and features screenings of documentaries related to social change. Finally, they produce various kinds of documentaries and institutional films for organizations driven by social change endeavours.

Collectif Porte-Voix's stunning prevention book "Parcours, Chacun son Temps".

Collectif Porte-Voix’s stunning prevention book “Parcours, Chacun son Temps”.

Musee des Beaux Arts
Seanna met with Marilyn Lajeunesse, Educational program officer at the Musee des Beaux Arts. She had learned about the museum’s progressive community engagement program “Sharing the Museum” at a recent Power of the Arts Forum. Started 15 years ago, this program, supported by the museum’s foundation, collaborates with diverse community partners both outside the museum’s walls with communities and inside the museum’s art studios. Community partnerships include homeless drop-ins, eating-disorder clinics, and refugee centres. Dans la Rue was founded by Father Emmet Johns “Pops” in 1988. This charity organization helps homeless and at-risk-youth, providing care and services related to their immediate needs and to help them acquire skills needed “to lead more autonomous and rewarding lives.” The Day Center offers two artistic spaces running programs on a weekly basis (a visual arts room and a music recording/production room), along with additional drop-in programs led by other community arts organizations such as Cirque Hors Piste.

montreal newsletter photo 4

La Ruche St Henri’s main room

La Ruche St Henri Art Hive in St. Henri is based in a storefront with a spacious backyard and stellar cellar (a depot for found materials once bound for the landfill and now repurposed for art-making.) Seanna visited with facilitators, Sarah Tevyaw and Nicole Macoretta, during the open studio workshop for seniors. Piano, loom, spinning wheel, books, ink, indigo dye, gardening and pencils…one can get involved with any of the supplies and projects, enjoy a cup of tea and chat with other participants in a relaxed, quiet and warm community studio that inspires creativity, camaraderie and belonging. La Ruche collaborates with neighbouring organizations including a hospital for cancer patients. Outpatient peer-support circles meet here to make art in a setting alternative to hospital. What a great community partnership! (Read more here.) Catherine and Seanna both met with Esther Filion from Engrenage Noir / ROUAGE. “Engrenage Noir, founded in Montréal in 2002, is an non-profit organization. Its program ROUAGE supports activist art practice financially and through training and networking. It aims at partnering with community organizations defending peoples’ rights and their members who share a similar form of oppression or social exclusion in order to see how an activist art project can support their work.”

montreal newsletter photo 5

Kay (on the right) and her visiting friend at Le Milieu

Seanna then met with Kay Noele at the Le Milieu – Atelier et Café de Quartier, an Art Hive near metro Beaudry. This small corner-store art studio/café has floor-to-ceiling shelves of art supplies open for the community. One person was sewing on a machine, another working on a silk screen, another writing. Delicious cake was ready and coffee was brewing. (Sales pay the rent!) Open for the community for free, this community art studio is run as a co-op with fee-paying members. Anyone can be a member by paying about $50. Members are encouraged to volunteer to keep the doors open for approximately 3-hour periods, teach an art activity, organize supplies or help out at the café. The co-op finds enough volunteers to run this open café & studio every day (7 days a week!) year-round. What every city neighbourhood would benefit from! Kay and the few facilitating the co-op make the work look easy and fluid, but there is an art to making this work so well. Visit and find out!

At the end of a busy day of site visits, Seanna met with Chad Lubelsky, a brilliant Program Director with the J. W. McConnell Family Foundation. This was a chance to thank Chad for the foundation’s support to ArtBridges and to keep the conversation going. The foundation has provided ArtBridges with the means to develop a theory of change, an evaluation framework, impact evaluation, as well as project development and capacity building. Chad loved to hear about our site visits and had some suggestions about other programs to see. We talked about the uniqueness of community arts and arts for social change projects going on in Québec and indeed through all regions in Canada- how projects vary from city to city, region to region, based on language, culture and resources.

Highlights of ArtBridges’ Site Visits in Montreal! 1/3

Last June, ArtBridges/ToiledesArts’s Project Director, Seanna Connell and Francophone Community Arts Coordinator, Catherine Lamaison, spent a week in Montréal to visit and meet 19 community partners and learn about the work that they do on the ground. While most of the ArtBridges/ToiledesArts’ team’s work is done online or over the phone from our Toronto office, getting a chance to travel, see community arts program in action and finally meet partners in person is always highly inspiring and gives all the meaning to our work.

We’ve decided to dedicate a series of 3 blog posts to the amazing community arts and arts for social change initiatives we’ve discovered in Montréal. There is something very particular about that place, and about the work that is made possible there. Seanna and myself have been amazed by the originality and innovation of programs, the variety of organization models, the dedication and drive of mostly volunteer staff, the resources available and the crucial understanding of the importance of community arts and arts for social change. We believe that stories and ideas need to travel more across provinces, and particularly across languages, and that the rest of Canada needs to be more aware of the kinds of projects that are developed in Québec. Here are highlights about each organization we met.

Monday, June 20th  la place commune Our first stop was in the Parc Extension neighbourhood, at a fairly new art hive — part of the Art Hives Network called La Place Commune. Primarily a coffee shop restaurant whose revenues help support the rent and staff, La Place Commune set up an arts corner with supplies that can be used for free. Come for a coffee or just to make art or both, this place is open and the members believe in shared economy. We then headed to Westmount to meet with Ruth Gagnon and her assistant Anne-Celine at Elizabeth Fry Society du Québec. We talked specifically about their art programs and about the Art Entr’Elles collective and its projects. Art Entr’Elles is a non-profit organization gathering criminalized women and professional artists in collaborative projects. Through the making of art, this collective of women support self-esteem building, sense of belonging to a community, critical thinking, socio-political expression and reinsertion to society. Tuesday, June 21st We started our second day in Montreal with a meeting with the Culture Days team in their Mile Ex office. Culture Days is a 3-day event across Canada aiming to get community engagement happening around the arts. This event is particularly important for communities that have little art events on a regular basis. They have provincial chapters that run Culture Days in each province independently. It was particularly interesting for us to have a discussion with another nation-wide organization. Catherine then met with Alyssa Kuzmarov from Productions Oracle near Concordia University campus. Productions Oracle is a bilingual non-profit organization providing at-risk youth and adults with creative modes of expression through writing and video-making workshops. Participants are encouraged to share their experiences through an empowering process of documentary-making while developing social skills and values of respect and tolerance. Productions Oracle also offers production services for social and educational videos as well as promotional and corporate videos.

Liam and Dan, co-founders of Spectrum Productions.

Liam and Dan, co-founders of Spectrum Productions.

We stopped by Spectrum Productions summer camp, in Le Plateau. Working with individuals on the Autism Spectrum, Spectrum Productions is a community-based non-profit organization that provides “social, creative, exploratory and employment opportunities” through workshops, summer camps and various programs focusing on film and media production. Most of the programs are run in their own space part of an arts building in Le Plateau, with multiple rooms and professional video equipment. At the end of a day of site visits we were so happy to finally meet Jacinthe Laforte for the first time! Jacinthe has been translating ArtBridges/ToileDesArts content from English to French since 2011 remotely. She was originally referred to ArtBridges by Engrenage Noir / ROUAGE. What a delight to finally meet in person after 5 years and enjoy a glass of wine together! Don’t miss the rest of our site visits highlights in Montréal in tomorrow’s blog post!

Jacinthe Laforte and Seanna Connell. from ArtBridges

Jacinthe Laforte and Seanna Connell. from ArtBridges

Homelessness and Social Inequality: “10 Years of State of Emergency” Last days of the touring exhibition in Winnipeg!

Screen Shot 2014-09-26 at 4.49.28 PM

“The touring exhibition “10 Years of State of Emergency” organized by ATSA is coming to an end. After visiting nine Cultural Centres in Montreal and travelling to Québec, Drummondville, Trois-Rivières, Frederiction, Vancouver, Calgary, it is visible for a few more days at the Centre Culturel Franco-Manitobain in Winnipeg!

About “10 Years of State of Emergency”:

“After producing 11 editions of the État d’Urgence “manifestival”, which garnered the 2008 Citoyen de la Culture prize, ATSA created a multidisciplinary visual exhibition featuring works by over 20 artists—local, Canadian and foreign—who made original contributions to État d’Urgence during the event’s run between 1998 and 2010, covering video, photography, illustration, poster art, archival film, soundtracks and installations.The public is invited to discover these colourful, ingenious, sensitive, playful and impactful artistic statements that all deal with the theme of homelessness and the encounter of that often-feared individual: the outsider. Welcome to the artistic universe of État d’Urgence, a voyage that leaves no-one indifferent, and that makes the case that art can be a means of survival.”

To learn more about the artists and the exhibition, go to the ATSA website : http://atsa.qc.ca/10-ans-d-urgence
or the CCFM website : http://www.ccfm.mb.ca/francais/index_fr.php

The exhibition is held at the Centre Culturel Franco-Manitobain in Saint-Boniface 340, boulevard Provenche, Winnipeg (Manitoba)”

source: ATSA newsletter and press release, Centre Culturel Franco-Manitobain website.

Screen Shot 2014-09-26 at 4.15.18 PM

photos credits: ATSA
-posted with permission from ATSA
Read profil ATSA’s profile in ArtBridges’ Community-engaged Arts Directory & Map

Summer Intensive Workshop in Arts for Social Change (ASC! Project, Vancouver)

asc-intensiveworkshop

A Six-Day, Art for Social Change (ASC) Summer Intensive Workshop

“One of the most effective ways we have to nurture positive change in the world is to create dialogue that enables us to see the world through a creative lens, one that encourages pragmatic innovation through the use of our imaginations.

Here is an opportunity to experience some of the many ways that anyone interested in how art for social change approaches (including games and other forms of play, dialogue and facilitation techniques, and art-making in a variety of disciplines) can stimulate and inform creative strategies – as well as the creation of art – in our lives. No experience necessary!

Participants will learn about and practice diverse approaches, skills, and contexts that are used in Canada and around the world to stimulate creative thinking and innovation, nurture insight, solve problems and create new ideas for engagement, collaboration and action.

This intensive will be taught by Judith Marcuse with guests from the field; it will include dialogues, reading, video showings and small-scale projects.

Judith Marcuse, a senior artist/practitioner and teacher, is the founder of The International Centre of Art for Social Change (ICASC) and the lead investigator in the Art for Social Change! Project. For over 35 years, her local and international work in community and academic settings has aimed to create a more just and sustainable world through participation in the arts.

When: 10 am to 4pm, August 24th – 29th (Sunday to Friday), 2014
Where: TBA (a location in downtown Vancouver)
Fee: $350

Please register early. The workshop has limited capacity and will fill quickly.

REGISTER: http://artforsocialchangeworkshop.eventbrite.ca

Posted with permission from:
Judith Marcuse LL.D. (Hon.)
Artistic Producer, Judith Marcuse Projects
Founder/Co-Director, International Centre of Art for Social Change

Lead investigator in the Art for Social Change! Project

Read International Centre of Art for Social Change’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

ASC! (Art for Social Change) PROJECT (Canada)

ASC! Project

ArtBridges/ToileDesArts is a collaborator with the ASC! (Art for Social Change) Project. We are pleased to tell you that the ASC! Project’s website just went live in December! You are welcome to read regular updates and make comments: http://art-for-social-change.ca/

” The ASC! (Art for Social Change) research project brings together artists, scholars, students and change makers from diverse public and private sectors to better understand how these practices are evolving in Canada as well as to provide information, opportunities for exchange, and resources for both practitioners and those interested to learn more about the field. Over the next five years, we will share our research here and provide suggestions and perspectives about the field.

In 2013, The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) provided a $2.5 million grant to support the ASC! Project, a five-year, national research initiative on art for social change, the first study of its kind in Canada.”
-from ASC! home page

Posted with permission from:
Judith Marcuse LL.D. (Hon.)
Artistic Producer, Judith Marcuse Projects
Founder/Co-Director, International Centre of Art for Social Change
Adjunct Professor/Artist in Residence, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Senior Fellow, Ashoka International
Read International Centre of Art for Social Change’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map