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Indigenous Arts Program Grants (First Peoples’ Cultural Council)

FPCC Arts Program deadlines have been extended to October 6, 2020!

Select grants in the Indigenous Arts Program and the Indigenous Music Initiative are now accepting applications for the Fall 2020 intake from Indigenous residents and organizations in B.C.

The Fall 2020 intake includes the following:

The Indigenous Arts Program (IAP)

The Indigenous Music Initiative (IMI)

For more information, please visit: http://www.fpcc.ca/

-from First Peoples’ Cultural Council

Online Dance Workshop with All Bodies Dance Project (Aug 22)

“In this 1-hour online workshop participants will be dancing, moving, and exploring what each unique dancing body has to say! Learn how to move creatively and connect to your body with All Bodies Dance Project facilitators Carolina Bergonzoni and Harmanie Rose. The workshop is open to participants with and without disabilities. No previous experience required.

All Bodies Dance Project (ABDP) is an inclusive dance company located on unceded Coast Salish Territory (Vancouver, BC). Founded in 2014, ABDP brings together artists with and without disabilities to explore movement as a means of creative expression. The group offers accessible dance classes for adults and youth of all abilities in addition to creating opportunities for diverse artists to practice, research and create innovative, inclusive dance.”

For more information and to register, please visit: https://www.facebook.com/events/338974674131772/

-from All Bodies Dance Project

Call for Submissions: Mount Pleasant Community Arts Screen (MPCAS, Vancouver)

“We accept submissions on an ongoing basis.
To be considered for the Fall/ Winter 2020 program, submissions must be received by July 31st, 2020 at 4pm.
Submissions received after this date will be considered at a later time

Background:
The MPCAS is a 7×4 metre outdoor community and media arts LED screen, located on unceded Coast Salish territories at Kingsway and Broadway in Mount Pleasant. Broadcasting from 9am to 10pm most days, it is programmed by grunt gallery, an artist-run centre that has been in the neighbourhood since 1984. For more information please visit mpcas.ca

*please note the screen does not have audio capabilities, therefore all submitted content is currently limited to image and captioning only.

PLACE:
The current programming theme of the MPCAS is PLACE, which looks at a changing Mount Pleasant and Vancouver through works by artists, curators, and residents who live here or are connected to the area, exploring its past, current, and future vitality.

Mount Pleasant was one of Vancouver’s earliest neighborhoods, built along a large salmon and trout creek that ran from the swampy higher grounds down to the ocean — the same path as what is now Main Street. The area became a focus of colonial settlement in the mid-19th century and local Indigenous communities were forced out to make way for businesses that grew into a bustling destination neighbourhood. By 1910, business moved west with Shaughnessy becoming the preferred neighbourhood, and Mount Pleasant fell into economic decline for almost 100 years. With working-class roots, abundant rental housing, and transient tenants, it was the poorest neighbourhood outside of the Downtown Eastside. A community of immigrants, urban poor, and artists created the conditions from which much of Vancouver’s early modern cultural life grew.

Beginning in the 1990s, Mount Pleasant’s gentrification started to take hold, initially through the live/work studio condos that gradually began to appear in the area. In 2010, with the development in the Olympic Village area, aggressive upzoning began, and many residents were evicted from their long-held homes as rents doubled and tripled within a few years. Mount Pleasant’s gritty characteristics suddenly became its new selling points. Developer marketing highlighted its arts community and heritage buildings—although ironically both became early targets in the gentrification process. Mount Pleasant quickly transformed from one of Vancouver’s cheapest neighbourhoods to one of its most expensive, ground zero for the increasing unaffordability of the city.

The MPCAS engages with this complex and, at times, tense history of displacement, creativity, expansion and grit

Participate:
Our vision is to provide an urban screen with content received from and responsive to its viewers, in contrast to the advertising/consumer paradigm that is the rule with most highly visible screens in a public space.  

As we build a program that reflects, engages with and enriches the complex cultural history of Vancouver’s Mount Pleasant neighbourhood, our call for submissions welcomes contributions from artists, collectives, curators and other community members, organizations and community festivals. Topics could include (but are not limited to) identity, language, housing, city streets, food, neighbourhoods, landmarks, loss, memories, narratives of the past, and potential futures.

The racialized, immigrant and working class communities that have been the backbone of Mount Pleasant have also been disproportionately impacted by the economic swings and recent gentrification of the area. Without a doubt, the history of this unique neighbourhood is entwined with colonial legacies and systemic inequities, and we invite submissions that explore the idea of place from the angle of disPLACEment, too.

Generally speaking, submitted works should be ten minutes or less in length and could include (but are not limited to) still images, time-based media, animations, performance works, archival video, interactive pieces, GIFs, experimental video, event proposals, and curatorial/screening proposals.”

For more information and submission details, please see grunt gallery’s newsletter.

-from grunt gallery
Read grunt gallery’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

BIPOC Writers Connect: Facilitating Mentorship, Creating Community

“Last year, The Writers’ Union of Canada and the League of Canadian Poets invited selected Black, Indigenous, and racialized emerging writers from the Greater Toronto Area to connect with industry professionals, funding officers, and established authors. Each attendee left feeling energized and inspired about their own writing practice. We are pleased to be able to continue and expand this program this year with Toronto and Vancouver events.

We are committed to cultivating space where BIPOC writers can share tools, strategies, feedback, and knowledge. We are also cognizant of the continuing uncertainties and risks surrounding COVID-19. The Union and the League have monitored announcements from public health authorities and each level of government in Toronto and Vancouver since we launched the conference in April. After much consideration toward the health and safety of each participant, volunteer and staff members, TWUC and LCP have ultimately decided to move forward with adapting both conferences for online delivery.

We are confident that BIPOC Writers Connect will be a fulfilling, exciting, and inspiring event for Black, Indigenous, and racialized emerging and established writers. Amid the uncertainties we are all facing in these unprecedented times, we believe that this opportunity for mentorship and community is more valuable than ever before.”

For more information and to apply, please visit: https://www.writersunion.ca/bipoc-writers-connect

-from The Writers’ Union of Canada

REMEMBER THIS: A free online film program in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

REMEMBER THIS is a free, inter-generational, online program engaging people to connect with each other and create films. Reel Youth facilitators will lead guided creative writing and filmmaking activities that will capture people’s experiences, wisdom, and relationship to the land while living through the Covid-19 pandemic. No experience is necessary! 

Up to 60 participants from across British Columbia will be selected, based on geographic diversity, to create their own short film. The strongest films will be distributed through Reel Youth & Real Estate Foundation of BC’s online media channels and mixed together in a summary video.

REMEMBER THIS includes six online sessions (90 mins each) for participants of all ages to gather with Reel Youth facilitators over ZOOM and create community through the media arts. You will be introduced to principles of filmmaking as a tool for social change, and practice media production skills by shooting and editing an original short video from home. You will need access to a smartphone, tablet, or a video camera and computer in order to participate.

Sessions are from 10:30am to 12pm PDT on:

Tuesday, April 14
Wednesday, April 15
Friday, April 17
Monday, April 20
Friday, April 24
Monday, April 27

Application deadline is April 10th at 12pm.”

For more information, please visit: https://www.rememberthis.online/

-from Reel Youth

Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen (Vancouver)

“The MPCAS is an outdoor urban screen located on unceded Coast Salish territories, in the Mount Pleasant neighbourhood of Vancouver, BC, Canada. Launched in December 2019, the MPCAS reflects its neighbourhood through artwork by local and commissioned artists, with a special focus on works exploring the area’s history, its current vitality and its future. This art-specific urban screen brings new digital technology to Mount Pleasant and the City of Vancouver with an inaugural year of non-commercial programming around the theme of PLACE, presenting a diverse range of visual and media art by over fifty artists, community members, and community festivals reflecting on what it is to live in a changing Mount Pleasant neighbourhood.

The screen is programmed by grunt gallery on an ongoing basis, via open calls for submissions, community-based outreach, collaborations and curated programs.

Location: Intersection of Broadway & Kingsway, Vancouver, on the side of the Independent Building.

Autumn / Winter Hours (01 October to 31 March)
Sunday to Thursday: 9:00 AM to 9:30 PM
Friday & Saturday: 9:00 AM to 10:30 PM

Spring / Summer Hours (01 April to 30 September)
Sunday to Thursday: 9:00 AM to 10:00 PM
Friday & Saturday: 9:00 AM to 11:00 PM”

For more information, please visit: https://www.mpcas.ca/

-from grunt gallery
Read grunt gallery’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

16th Annual Downtown Eastside Heart of the City Festival (Oct 30-Nov 10, Vancouver)

“ANNOUNCING the 16thannual Downtown Eastside Heart of the City Festival and twelve days of music, stories, theatre, poetry, cultural celebrations, films, dance, readings, forums, workshops, discussions, gallery exhibits, mixed media, art talks, history talks and history walks. This year’s theme Holding the Light has emerged from the compelling need of DTES-involved artists and residents to illuminate the vitality and relevance of the Downtown Eastside community and its diverse and rich traditions, knowledge systems, ancestral languages, cultural roots and stories.

The mandate of the Downtown Eastside Heart of the City Festivalis to promote, present and facilitate the development of artists, art forms, cultural traditions, history, activism, people and great stories about Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. The festival involves a wide range of professional, community, emerging and student artists and lovers of the arts. Over 1,000 local artists and Downtown Eastside residents participated in last year’s Festival.

Many events are free or by suggested donation.”

For more information, please visit: http://www.heartofthecityfestival.com/

-photo by David Cooper
-from Downtown Eastside Heart of the City Festival

Call for Artists: Granville Island Community Market (Kickstart Disability Arts & Culture)

Kickstart Disability Arts & Culture is seeking local visual artists who identify as living with a disability to share a market booth at the Granville Island Community Market this summer. Every Thursday from June – September 2019, Kickstart will be on Granville Island, doing community outreach, and we’d like to have a different artist share the booth with us each week. It is an unbelievable experience and a free opportunity to get your work in front of the public and the opportunity to sell work. This is also a paid opportunity for Artists.

Deadline: ongoing

Kickstart is a Vancouver-based non-profit registered charity, founded in 1998, with a mandate to support and promote artists with disabilities. We do this by presenting professional work by artists with disabilities to public audiences, raising public awareness of their contribution to the arts, and paying the artists for their work.”

For more information, please visit: https://www.kickstartdisability.ca/granville-island-community-market/

-submitted by Kickstart Disability Arts & Culture

Creative Facilitation 1 Workshop: Using Creative Activities as Facilitation Tools (Partners for Youth Empowerment)

“In this one-of-a-kind training, you’ll learn how to lead engaging, high impact programs that inspire and motivate. This training provides a framework for using creative practices in any program, classroom, training, or conference regardless of content or age group: from pre-schoolers to seniors.

  • Discover how taking creative risks builds confidence, leadership, and group trust.
  • Learn how to  create safe spaces that allow even the quietest participants to shine.
  • Gain a tool box of easy-to-lead activities you can use the very next day.
  • Guild confidence in your own creativity and your ability to be an engaging, inspiring leader.

No arts experience required. We are all creative!

September 21-22 | Vancouver, BC
October 25-26 | Montreal, QC”

For more information and to register, please visit: http://www.partnersforyouth.org/training/creative-facilitation/

-from Partners for Youth Empowerment

Call for Artists: Arts Integration Learning Lab (ArtStarts in Schools, Vancouver)

“Are you a professional artist interested in working with young people and educators in schools, but not sure where to start?

Already have experience working in schools, but want to enhance your skills and meet other artists in the field?

The Arts Integration Learning Lab is an immersive, five-day development experience for artists, designed to build your capacity to work alongside educators. Local artists and mentors will prepare you with the skills to plan, fund, and lead arts-integrated experiences in schools and classrooms across the province!

The deadline to apply is April 8th, 2019.

Apply here”

-from ArtStarts in Schools