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Posts Tagged ‘fnmi’

Talking Treaties Spectacle & Under the Concrete (Touching Ground Festival)

Talking Treaties is a participatory multi-arts project, with the goal of artfully sharing local Indigenous knowledge and awareness. Talking Treaties engaged over 300 participants in its research and development, generating symbols, poetry, and expressive maps, which have influenced and are now featured as content in the production. This project strives to expand meaning, knowledge, and personal relationships to encompass the historical and contemporary responsibilities we share as treaty people.

Talking Treaties Spectacle
A large-scale immersive performance and installation, bringing together professional and community performers.

Under the Concrete
A choral reflection on our themes of history, questioning, learning and acknowledging for all of who now live on this land.

Times:
Friday, June 23, 6:30 pm
Saturday, June 24, 12-6 pm (installation only)
Sunday, June 25, 5 pm”

For more information about the Touching Ground Festival including the full festival schedule, please visit touchinggroundfestival.ca

-submitted by Jumblies Theatre
Read Jumblies’ Profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory & Map

DAREarts Attawapiskat 2017 Song: We are the People & Reflection: artist-educator

The following post originally appears in DAREarts blog and has been reposted with DAREarts’ permission. Special thanks to DAREarts for sharing this piece with us and for inviting ArtBridges to participate. For more information on DAREarts, please visit DAREarts.com 

Written by DAREarts artist-educator Glenn Marais.

“DAREarts came to the community of Attawapiskat to hear a story about the original Bear Clan from a knowledge keeper, John Matthews, and to take that story and create a film, visual art, a song and a slideshow of pictures to accompany the music. We worked for three days, two seventy five minute periods, with the high school students on a very condensed schedule, including two evenings and one day after school.  What happened was incredible as the students and teachers came together and worked in the spirit of true partnership to create a stunning and moving cinematic interpretation of the story, with original music created by them and a powerful and moving song that expressed the story of their lives and their love of the land.

The sun sets late in Attawapiskat. At 10:00 O’clock it starts to go down and the night sky comes out, crystal clear constellations arcing across the stratosphere, a sailor’s map, starry legends over a world that sleeps but does not rest.  It rises early, breaking the horizon with a brilliant northern radiance illuminating the dusty streets and weathered roofs of the reserve.  The homes are falling apart after the tyranny of the long, cold winter and the morning sounds of rumbling trucks and nails being driven, blend into the chaotic orchestra of a community waking and beginning to move through the day. Its sounds are just like any other town or community coming to life with the promise of the morning. Only here, it is less about promise than survival. There is a magnificent white Catholic church, tall and majestic by the water with stained glass windows that tell the history of the people and whispers of apologies for past wrongs.  Truths have yet to come and apologies given for Residential schools and that is part of the healing that must happen. It is part of a history long buried, that has been disturbed, opened and left like a forgotten graveyard.

Today’s youth live within the reality of the schools ignoble past.  In the shadow of their parents haunted memories, they struggle to burst free and find the glorious sun that shines so long in the summer and hibernates in the winter. Yesterday, one of the high school students walked and talked with us and her words were true, direct and honest, filled with a piercing, unabated intelligence that captivated and charmed us and as she ascended the wooden stairs that are ubiquitous in this community, slowly opening the door to her home that rested in a state of decay, my heart broke for her and I felt ashamed because my feelings seem powerless to help her.

The name reserve fails to describe the pulsing heart of this community.  What a shallow name for a community of people.  We name things in this world for convenience of categorization and to displace the fact that we have committed wrongs. A dressed up wound still bleeds despite our arrogant nature and human nature is arrogant, particularly when it vaunts it’s self as civilized and tromps over anything that doesn’t fit inside it’s neat, tight lineage. The reserve isn’t a dumping ground for an inconvenient culture.  It is a living breathing community that celebrates and mourns, dances and shuffles, sings and cries like any other.  When you fly into a northern community, the sheer beauty of it is staggering.  Hundreds of pristine lakes and rivers dot the landscape of silty islands, whose fish laden waters and abundant wildlife enrich the land. The land is the mother and the connection runs deep, through memories, and stories of creation, and growth with 44 clans coming from the original clan bear clan.  An ancient system of identification and relationship to the animal world that kept the bloodlines as pure as the waters that surround this island community.  The name Attawapiskat means, “People of the parting of the rocks” and it is an island of many created by the surge of the mighty Attawapiskat river, where the people live in harmony with great respect for nature and the balance of life.

This land is much more than its surface appearance of dirt, dusty roads and broken homes. It has the pulse of the Earth mother and connects the people in ways we can’t begin to imagine. We look at land as possession, here it is the heartbeat of a world that is interdependent, with everything flowing and weaving in and out of a glorious kaleidoscopic tapestry that bedazzles the eyes and stirs the soul. It is the sound of a motorboat powering a launch into the rising sun, the crack of a rifle across a winter plain, bringing home food to a family during the cold winter season, and it is the cry of the pow wow singer whose voice is the sound of the elders echoing through the universe. What great spirit inhabits this land and what wonders await if we can learn to walk in humble shoes and beside our First Nations people.

I have heard people say we should remove them from the reserve and integrate them into society as if the “them” in this conversation are inanimate beings that we can move on some self-righteous chessboard. What about a question? How can we work with you to make things better for you? Where can we begin and sit down with you as brothers and sisters in a circle and come to an understanding and a reckoning of our true history, so that we can move forward together, like the two rows on the Iroquois Wampum belt, in a peaceful union? I don’t dream of such things, I speak of them and when I play my guitar and sing and drum, I sing to the heavens, the Earth, my family and my promise, to never stop until things change.  For now, I walk these dusty roads with my eyes, ears and heart open and look always forward to the sun, moon and stars, just like the words in the song that we wrote together:

“We are the sun, moon and stars, we are the trees
All around us, is everything we need
Everything we need is all around”

We live in an abundant world, made shallow by greed, and in this great land of broken promise and faded dreams are the glittering embers of a glorious past that knew, everything we needed was around us and not to take more than we needed. I heard a story on this trip from a noble young man of great character from Attawapiskat, who told us of being pursued by a wolf, when his skidoo broke down.  He told us how he shot around the wolf to scare him off and kept doing this even as the wolf closed in on him.  A man of lesser character would have killed the wolf.  He did not. This is the character of a man cast in iron and made of blood and bone who taught me so much with the simple power of his story.  Our life is meant to be lived in the teachings, with humility and wisdom with respect for ourselves and the world, with courage in the face of danger, so that we will lead with love and honesty, and in that way come to know our truth. To know the teachings of the grandfathers is easy, to live them is hard. Thank you my young friend for a life well lived and lessons well taught.


To read an overview of DAREarts’ week in Attawapiskat, click here.

DAREarts is a charity that empowers young at-risk Canadians aged 9 to 19 to ignite change as leaders. Visit darearts.com to learn more. DAREarts ‘First Roots’ program partners with First Nations to work alongside youths, local artists and elders and, together, address challenges such as school absenteeism, hopelessness and suicide.

PROJECT SUPPORTERS: Province of Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture & Sport; Ontario150; Northbridge Insurance; Anne Livingston; David & Teresa Thomas; Noront Resources; The Paul Semple Award; Allan Drive Middle School”

-posted with permission from DAREarts, read the original post here
Read DAREarts’ profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

DAREarts in Attawapiskat: “Our Stories are a Part of Us”

The following post originally appears in DAREarts blog and has been reposted with DAREarts’ permission. Special thanks to DAREarts for sharing this piece with us and for inviting ArtBridges to participate. For more information on DAREarts, please visit DAREarts.com 

“In June 2017, DAREarts returned to Attawapiskat FN for a week of empowering workshops that helped many youth discover their voices and inner leadership. DAREarts workshops are facilitated by DAREarts artist-educators in partnership with the community. 

The first of our team to arrive in Attawapiskat FN was DAREarts artist-educator and cinematographer Peter Elliott, who met with the grade 7s of Kattawapiskak Elementary School on Friday to introduce them to DAREarts and the art of filmmaking. The class watched several short films created by other DAREarts First Nations youth. Peter then dared the class to take a big risk without being afraid of failure: they were going to create their own short film in just ONE day! In groups, the class ventured out onto the school grounds armed with cameras and creativity, capturing a variety of different angles and shots. Peter then used this footage, along with stock footage of an alligator, to bring their hilarious creation to life as “Attawapigator”. When they saw their video it was a raging success, and they asked for an encore viewing. Despite many of the students being quiet and shy, they were now ready to take on more DAREarts!

DAREarts Lead Teacher Laura MacKinnon, DAREarts artist-educator and musician Glenn Marais, and ArtBridges’ Seanna Connell arrived over the weekend to join Peter. The team met the grade 9 class at Vezina Secondary School on Monday morning, and after a creative introduction the class welcomed knowledge keeper John Matthews. He captivated the students with a story of the first clan, the Bear Clan, offering the youths inspiration for the week ahead. In the afternoon the team met the grade 12 class and repeated their introductions, and John Matthews returned to share the story with them as well. Both classes were invited to work with the team in the evenings throughout the week. The first evening had a small turnout, but was massively productive! Colin arrived first, spending the evening making beats on the keyboard with Glenn, brainstorming lyrics with Laura, and learning to use the video camera with Peter. Tyler then arrived, making a beeline for Glenn who worked with him to compose a whole melody on the keyboard. Chandler and Jamie were the last to arrive, working with Laura and Seanna to capture footage and write the film’s plot.

Tuesday was fast-paced, with the class formed into two groups: the Musicians and the Film Crew. The musicians worked with Glenn and Laura on the verses for their song and created music for their short film, while the film crew started casting and shooting their first scene with Peter and Seanna. A few of the youths were hanging back, but they took action when given the roles of assistant director, set photographer, and editor. In the evening, youths Keenan, Colin, and Jack Jr. (who is also a DAREarts Leadership Award recipient) arrived right away. Keenan worked with Glenn and Jack Jr. to record two rap verses he had written during the day, and Colin was joined by another arriving youth, Chandler, to go out and film using the shot list.

On Wednesday, another group was created: Visual Artists! Throughout the day, the musicians finished writing the chorus of their song and prepared introductory music for the film score. One youth, Ambrose, skillfully layered different notes and sounds to add the finishing touches to the chorus. The film crew worked on several group shot scenes in the teepee frame near the school, with youth Jade working as our set photographer. The visual artists created chalk pastel drawings of bears that were integrated into the film using green screen. In the evening, several youths met to record parts of the song, and Jack Jr. offered to narrate the film. Colin acted as audio engineer, Syvanna sang the chorus, Jack Jr. sang and recorded a traditional hand drum song, and Tyler rapped to add a powerful end to the track.

Thursday was a special Culture Days celebration at the school, so our team spent the day preparing the materials the youths had created. On Friday afternoon, everyone was welcomed to a special feast at the school that celebrated both the traditional Culture Days activities and the youths’ accomplishments with DAREarts. The feast began with a prayer and then everyone ate, enjoying many local delights. Once finished, they squeezed into teacher Mandy Alves’s classroom to screen the youths’ film, “Bear Clan”, and a slideshow music video created using their song and photography. There was laughter and joy all around! The students and audience squished together for a group photo before saying their goodbyes for the night.  It was the perfect end to a very special week, and the youths were so proud to bring smiles to the faces of their elders, teachers, families, and community members.


To read artist-educator Glenn Marais’s reflection, click here.

DAREarts is a charity that empowers young at-risk Canadians aged 9 to 19 to ignite change as leaders.  Visit darearts.com to learn more. DAREarts ‘First Roots’ program partners with First Nations to work alongside youths, local artists and elders and, together, address challenges such as school absenteeism, hopelessness and suicide.

PROJECT SUPPORTERS: Province of Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture & Sport; Ontario150; Northbridge Insurance; Anne Livingston; David & Teresa Thomas; Noront Resources; The Paul Semple Award; Allan Drive Middle School”

-posted with permission from DAREarts, read the original post here
Read DAREarts’ profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Red Dress Productions presents DRIFT SEEDS (June 9-11, Toronto)


“Red Dress Productions is pleased to announce DRIFT SEEDS
a poetic parody for people living in absurd times

On June 9th, 10th & 11th, a multi-disciplinary, multi-sensory, 3-day, outdoor theatre production will descend on Winchester Park. Over 100 musicians, dancers, actors, singers, puppeteers, visual artists and production volunteers from diverse communities including hearing artists, Deaf artists, blind and sighted artists, wheelchair users, and LGBTQ & 2 spirited artists, have infused this creative process to shape the aesthetic of this extra-live, ambitious, community creation.

In Drift Seeds, young birds are born and as they begin to stretch their wings a menacing “Bird Watcher” descends upon their home and cages them. At the same time, the self-appointed leader of the land “Rock Robin” has been brought down and someone must take responsibility. “Sparrow” confesses, and is apprehended but the suggestion of a cover up is raised. A group of activists parody the official state mourning in a mock funeral procession while trying to find answers to what has really happened. Their protest grows, the “truth” is revealed, and all the birds are released. Just as the seasons cycle, so turns the wheel of life, and once the birds fly away to freedom, the story begins again with the rebirth of baby birds. The performance starts anew and loops until the end of the evening.

This community performance developed out of three-years of artistic exploration with communities in Toronto’s Winchester Park and St James Town. Drift Seeds is the sum of many parts: a fictional collage created out of fragments harvested through artistic exploration that revealed themes of loss and discovery, migrations and transformation, safety and danger, inclusion and isolation, hope and resistance.

As part of the performance, the Seed Share Curio, features interactive installations that present works created from the time when Drift Seeds was just a determined seed, a glimmering possibility.

We welcome audiences of all ages and all abilities. Elements of visual description and American Sign Language feature throughout the performance, and the space is accessible to wheelchair and mobility device users. As well as English, spoken languages include pieces in Urdu, Korean, Spanish, Mandarin, and Russian.

Dress Rehearsals
Wednesday June 7th & Thursday June 8th 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Performance Dates
Friday June 9th, 7:00pm to 9:00pm in Winchester Park
Saturday June 10th, 7:00pm to 9:00pm in Winchester Park
Sunday June 11th, 1:00pm to 3:00pm in Winchester Park”

-submitted by Red Dress Productions
Read Red Dress Productions’ profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Call for Emerging Artists / Appel aux artistes émergents : Elemental Festival 2017 (Manitoulin Island, ON)

Call for Emerging Artists – Elemental Festival 2017
Deadline: May 31st, 2017

4elements Living Arts welcomes proposals from emerging artists who would like to participate in this year’s Elemental Festival in Kagawong | Gaagigewang on Mnidoo Mnising |Manitoulin Island.

Elemental Festival is a site-specific multi-arts gathering that occurs annually during the salmon run in the fall. Our small village centers around the Kagawong River that runs over Bridal Veil Falls and empties into Mudge Bay at the northern side of the island. Billings Township has a population of approximately 500 year- round residents, living in a stunning northern Ontario location, on the North Channel of Lake Huron. Its closest neighbouring community is M’Chigeeng First Nation, one of six First Nation Territories on Manitoulin Island.

This year, we invite proposals for temporary sculptural installations, film/new media works and writing, that consider questions of land, and land-use history. We are particularly interested in the relations between the land, environmental change, and reconciliation given the impact of settlement, forestry, farming, and Treaty history, on Manitoulin Island in particular. How has colonization shaped how we understand the land? What are relations between environmental issues and Treaties? How do we re/claim land through land-based practices, art and art-making? Festival engagements will encourage consideration of the relations between land, environment/environmental change and reconciliation; they will acknowledge the important role of the many cultural communities within and adjacent to Billings Township: the French, the English, and the First Nations (Ojibwe, Odaawaa and Pottawottami).

With the support from federal Canada 150 funding, 4elements and Billings Township will see 7 permanent public sculptures and 40 heritage plaques installed throughout the Township this year, creating a ‘Billings Art and Heritage Trail’. Six artists have been chosen via an extensive community engaged selection process; the 7th sculpture will be designed via a 4elements’ facilitated community collaborative design process. All permanent works will be installed by end of summer 2017 and will be ‘unveiled’ during Elemental Festival.

The emerging artist(s) selected from this call are asked to enter into a dialogue with one of the new permanent works as well as the curatorial theme, to challenge the idea that permanent public installations are static. Rather, we propose that the permanent works present entry points into a complex, multi-layered discussion and should act as provocations for discussion to be picked up and carried forward by community members, and in this case, the selected emerging artist(s). For further information about our village, the curatorial theme, or the selected permanent sculptures to respond to email: patricia@4elementslivingarts.org.

The selected emerging artists will receive an artist honorarium of $1000, plus accommodation if non-local. Artists must be able to attend the festival and arrive in time to complete installation a day prior to the festival opening. All applications are welcome and in particular, Francophone and First Nations artists are encouraged to get in touch.

Festival Dates: Sep 28 – Oct 1
Location: Kagawong | Gaagigewang, Manitoulin Island | Mnidoo Mnising

Application requirements:
Interested emerging artists can submit the following items attached as a single .pdf with the subject line ‘Emerging Artist Proposal – EF 2017’ to patricia@4elementslivingarts.org
1. Full name, address, and contact info; website if you have one
2. A brief project proposal (1 page or less).
3. A brief artist statement (1 paragraph).
4. Artist CV (2 pages or less)
5. Image list, stating title, date and any other relevant details.
Please also submit the following, separate from the .pdf:
6. Maximum of 5 good quality images or short video clip of your work with a corresponding image list (images should be no larger than 1MB)
7. $10 application fee via e-transfer or cheque mailed to the 4e office. This goes directly toward supporting the festival. If this is a barrier for you, please get in touch.
_____________________________________


Appel aux artistes émergents – Elemental Festival 2017
Date d’échéance : 31 mai 2017

4elements Living Arts invite tous les artistes émergents qui désirent participer au Elemental Festival de cette année à Kagawong | Gaagigewang on Mnidoo Mnising |Île Manitoulin, à faire leur demande.

Elemental Festival est un rassemblement artistique annuel se déroulant à l’automne pendant la migration anadrome des saumons. Notre petit village se trouve le long de la Rivière Kagawong, connectée aux chutes Bridal Veil et se terminant dans la baie Mudge au nord de l’île. Le canton de Billings a une population d’environ 500 habitants permanents, vivant dans un lieu exceptionnel au nord de l’Ontario dans le chenal nord du lac Huron. La communauté la plus proche est la Première nation M’Chigeeng, un des six Territoires des Premières Nations sur l’Île Manitoulin.

Cette année, nous acceptons des propositions d’artistes pour des installations sculpturales temporaires ainsi que des œuvres cinématographiques/nouveaux médias et d’écriture, qui discutent de la terre et de l’historique de l’utilisation des sols. Nous sommes particulièrement intéressés dans les liens entre la terre, les changements environnementaux et la réconciliation, étant donné l’impact de la colonisation, de la foresterie, de l’agriculture et de l’historique des traités sur l’Île Manitoulin. Comment la colonisation a-t-elle façonné la manière dont nous voyons la terre ? Quels sont les liens entre les préoccupations environnementales et les Traités ? Comment pouvons-nous réclamer la terre par le biais de pratiques axées sur la terre, les arts et la création artistique ? Les engagements au Festival encourageront la prise en compte des liens entre la terre, les changements environnementaux et la réconciliation. Ils permettront de reconnaître l’importance du rôle des trois communautés culturelles présentes autour et à l’intérieur du canton de Billings : La communauté française, anglaise et des Premières Nations (Ojibwe, Odaawaa et Pottawottami).

Cette année, avec le soutien financier du Fonds Canada 150, 4elements et le canton de Billings pourront présenter 7 sculptures publiques permanentes et 40 plaques commémoratives installées dans tout le canton, créant ainsi un sentier artistique et du patrimoine. Six artistes ont été choisis à l’aide d’un processus de sélection communautaire approfondi; la septième sculpture sera conçue par un processus de conception collaborative et communautaire élaboré par 4elements. Toutes les œuvres permanentes seront installées avant la fin de l’été 2017 et seront révélées pendant le Elemental Festival.

Les artistes émergents choisis par le biais de cette invitation seront demandés de rentrer en contact avec les nouvelles œuvres permanentes et le thème de l’œuvre pour contester l’idée que les installations publiques sont statiques. Au lieu de cela, nous proposons que les œuvres permanentes contiennent des points d’entrée et puissent entraîner des discussions complexes suffisamment pertinentes pour permette de faire réagir les membres de la communauté et les artistes émergents. Pour en savoir plus au sujet de notre village, du thème de l’œuvre ou des sculptures permanentes choisies, veuillez-nous envoyer un courriel à patricia@4elementslivingarts.org.

Les artistes émergents choisis recevront une récompense artistique et honorifique de 1 000 $, plus l’hébergement. Les artistes doivent être capables d’assister au festival et d’arriver à l’heure pour compléter l’installation une journée avant l’ouverture du festival. Toutes les demandes sont les bienvenues, et les artistes francophones et des Premières Nations sont encouragés à nous contacter.

Dates du festival : 28 septembre – 1 octobre
Lieux : Kagawong | Gaagigewang, Île Manitoulin | Mnidoo Mnising

Exigences relatives à la demande :
Les artistes émergents intéressés peuvent soumettre les exigences ci-dessous en un un seul fichier PDF, avec comme objet « Proposition Artiste émergent – EF 2017 » à patricia@4elementslivingarts.org
1. Nom au complet, adresse et coordonnées; site web (le cas échéant)
2. Une brève description du projet proposé (1 page ou moins)
3. Un bref énoncé de la part de l’artiste (1 paragraphe).
4. Le CV de l’artiste (2 pages ou moins)
5. Une liste d’images, de titres, dates et de tout autre détail pertinent.
Veuillez également soumettre les éléments suivants dans un fichier PDF séparé :
6. Un maximum de 5 images de bonne qualité ou un petit film vidéo de votre travail avec une série d’images en rapport avec la vidéo (les images ne doivent dépasser 1Mb).
7. Les frais de dossier de 10 $ doivent être envoyés par transfert électronique ou par chèque au bureau de 4e. Ces frais seront utilisés pour financer le festival. Veuillez nous contacter si vous penser être dans l’impossibilité de payer ces frais de dossier.”

-from 4elements Living Arts facebook
Read 4elements Living Arts’ profile on ArtBridges’ Community-engaged Arts Directory and Map

The Touching Ground Festival (Jumblies Theatre, Toronto)

“This spring Jumblies is producing the Touching Ground Festival – a suite of new works on a common theme – the culmination of many activities with many people over the past three years of inhabiting this brand new and ancient location – now called CityPlace, in this place now called Toronto. During our time here, we have delved into the Indigenous and layered histories and current sounds, sights and voices of the area, while also making connections across the city and the country. Threads from all of these explorations appear in our activities over the coming weeks.

As many of you already know, starting on Saturday May 13th, until the end of June, Touching Ground events will be taking place in three main areas: The Ground Floor (132 Fort York Blvd), Evergreen Brick Works (555 Bayview Ave.), and Historic Fort York (250 Fort York Blvd). In addition, Jumblies will be collaborating with our partners elsewhere in Toronto.

Click on each event for more information about some of our Festival highlights:

Plus: three short films, a giant turtle quilt, comics, a new musical in-progress, workshops, exhibitions, celebrations, and more!

For more information, including a full list of festival events, schedule, workshops, and how to get involved visit www.touchinggroundfestival.ca

-submitted by Jumblies Theatre
Read Jumblies’ Profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory & Map

Profile Highlight: Sault Ste. Marie Indian Friendship Centre

As ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory grows, we realize that it’s a bit overwhelming to read through all of the profiles. We’re hoping that by occasionally highlighting some profiles on our blog, you may learn about an initiative that you may not have initially seen in the directory. Also, if you know of a Canadian community-engaged arts for social change initiative that isn’t in our directory, but should be, please let us know! We love and need your input/feedback in building this resource! -Lisa, Content Coordinator at ArtBridges.ssm-logo

“Sewing Circle: Come early to assist with room set up please. Weekly Sewing Circle brings people together to learn the basics of machine sewing while completing simple projects. All materials & machines are provided. If you have not used a machine or sewed previously, this is for you. We have worked on ceremony skirts, feast bags & picnic blankets. Some started working on denim bags, others are working on ribbon shirts. If you have a machine,please bring it. Only those who are taking part in Sewing Circle will be permitted to enter. The front doors will always be locked. Participants can knock at the gym door for entrance. If participants leave for any reason, they will not be allowed to re-enter. Due to the high number of youth who are now taking part in this event, I want to ensure their safety while they are attending program. Coffee, tea & snacks will be provided.”

Other activities offered at Sault Ste. Marie Indian Friendship Centre are “Anishinaabemowin, Moccasin Making, Beading Night, Coffee House, Let’s Walk & Roll, Seasonal Traditional Teachings, Stages of Life Teachings.”

To read more about Sault Ste. Marie Indian Friendship Centre, please see their profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Ma

Outside Looking In’s 10th Anniversary Extravaganza Performance (ON)

“Over 70 Indigenous youth will take to the stage!

Please join Outside Looking In for their 10th Anniversary Extravaganza Performance on Thursday May 18th 2017, at the Sony Centre for the Performing Arts in downtown Toronto!

Click here to purchase tickets! (Enter VOLTO as a promo code to purchase tickets at a discounted price)”

For more information, please visit Outside Looking In

-from Outside Looking In website
Read Outside Looking In’s profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Job Posting: Indigenous Art Instructor (Art City, Winnipeg)

artcitywinnipeg-logo

“Art City is currently seeking an Indigenous Art Instructor, to be employed on a part-time basis.

Indigenous Art is a Special Program at Art City, which explores both traditional and contemporary Indigenous art practices. Workshops are held Saturdays, from 12:00 – 4:00 p.m., September – June. The Indigenous Art Instructor will develop program activities, in consultation with the Managing Director & Artistic Director, and will facilitate workshops with the assistance of one other staff and at least two volunteers. The Indigenous Art program is open to everyone: all ages and abilities, with a focus children, youth, and families.

In addition to the Indigenous Art program, the Indigenous Art Instructor will be a key member of the Art City staff, providing guidance and expertise to Art City’s team. There will be many opportunities to design and facilitate workshops in Art City’s extensive Community Programs (outreach) on an ad hoc basis, as well as Workshop Facilitation shifts in other Art City programs. In other words, 5 hours per week are guaranteed, with a strong likelihood for more.

Brief Job Description:

  • Develop and facilitate art programming that explores traditional and contemporary Indigenous art forms & practices
  • Engage participants of all ages & abilities
  • Lead other facilitators and volunteers in the Indigenous Art program
  • Schedule and assist guest artists with workshops
  • Resolve conflict as necessary
  • Organize and maintain supplies for workshops
  • Provide guidance and expertise in order to ensure Art City’s cultural proficiency and responsiveness in all programs
  • Assist with the development and delivery of Community Programs (outreach) workshops
  • Facilitate regular and special programs workshops as needed
  • Attend bi-weekly staff meetings

Qualifications:

  • Proficient knowledge of traditional and contemporary Indigenous art forms & practices
  • Uncompromising dedication to the preservation and proliferation of Indigenous culture in society
  • Ability to contribute to the development of art programming
  • Innovative and responsive
  • Experienced working with children and youth
  • Demonstrated leadership qualities
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Capacity to approach conflict in creative ways
  • Ability to work well in a team
  • Knowledge of inner-city issues
  • Positive role model for children and youth

Renumeration: $19.13/hour

Art City is an equal opportunity employer, however due to the nature of this position applicants must identify as First Nations, Inuit, or Métis.

Deadline for applications: 5:00 p.m. Monday, May 1, 2017

Please Send a Cover Letter and Resume/ CVs to:
Josh Ruth, Managing Director – md[at]artcityinc.com
Art City ž 616 Broadway Avenue, Winnipeg, MB ž R3C 0W8

*Please include 1-3 references with phone numbers*

Only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.”

-from Art City Inc. newsletter

Resource Highlight | Intimate stories: Aboriginal women’s lived experiences of health services in Northern British Columbia and the potential of creative arts to raise awareness about HPV, cervical cancer, and screening

intimatestories

Intimate stories: Aboriginal women’s lived experiences of health services in Northern British Columbia and the potential of creative arts to raise awareness about HPV, cervical cancer, and screening
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health | BC | 2012
Virginia L. Russell, Sarah de Leeuw

“Guided by feminist and community-based participatory methodologies and by efforts to decolonize health research practices, and undertaken with qualitative research methods (interviews, open-ended questionnaires, and analysis of arts-based expressions like storytelling, journaling, and picture-making), this research identified challenges and barriers that (predominantly Aboriginal) women in northern British Columbia faced when trying to access sexual health care services related to HPV and cervical cancer screening.”

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