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The 18th Annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival (Oct 18-22, Toronto)

“The 18th Annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival today announced the full programming for the Festival, running October 18-22, 2017 in Toronto, Canada. imagineNATIVE will present over 100 feature films, documentaries, shorts, and music videos created by Indigenous filmmakers with almost three quarters of the films (72%) made by Indigenous female directors.

imagineNATIVE’s opening night gala on Wednesday, October 18 will be Waru a film directed by eight Māori women, telling the story of Waru, a young boy who dies at the hands of his caregiver. Each director tackles a ten-minute segment of Waru to create one complete, remarkable story through the lens of multiple family and community members as they deal with the horrific loss. On Sunday, October 22, the closing night gala will be The Road Forward, a musical documentary by Métis/Dene award-winning filmmaker, Marie Clements.

imaginenative-logo

Highlights from imagineNATIVE‘s feature film programs include Indictment: The Crimes of Shelly Chartier, the true-crime story revolving around a captivating reclusive woman from a small northern Manitoba reserve whose catfishing of an NBA superstar made international headlines; Sweet Country, from director Warwick Thornton and starring Hamilton Morris and Sam Neill in a period western set on the Northern Territory frontier; Juliana & the Medicine Fish, starring Adam Beach and Emma Tremblay; Our People Will Be Healed, Alanis Obomsawin’s 50th film; and Kayak to Klemtu, the first feature film by Zoe Hopkins.

imagineNATIVE will also include a diverse selection of short film programs including the return of The Witching Hour, the annual midnight horror/comedy series; Receptors, a series of experimental, dramatic, and documentary shorts; Ambient Light, shedding a light on the polar region with five shorts from Sweden, Greenland and North America; and Channel 51 Igloolik, celebrating 30 years of Inuit video art with a world premiere screening of Bowhead Whale Hunting with My Ancestors by Carol Kunnuk and Zacharias Kunuk – the first episode from the seven-part television series, Hunting with my Ancestors.

imagineNATIVE is also proud to announce that Cree actor, humanitarian and activist Tina Keeper will receive the 2017 August Schellenberg Award of Excellence. Tina Keeper will receive her award at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival’s Awards Presentation on Sunday, October 22 at the TIFF Bell Lightbox.

imagineNATIVE will present A Wall is a Screen, a nighttime event that is part-walking-tour and part-film-screening that transforms the way people look at and interact with their city by projecting short films onto various surfaces. This will be the first time ever A Wall is a Screen will feature all Indigenous-made short films.

imagineNATIVE‘s music showcase The Beat, co-presented by Revolutions Per Minute (RPM), returns with live performances from Mob BounceKayla BriëtZiibiwan, and DJ Kookum, and a screening of eight music videos by Indigenous filmmakers and musicians.

The Digital Media Art+Cade, sponsored by Rezolution Pictures/Schoolü, returns to imagineNATIVE with projects including: The Cache, a digital photo essay from the Ammaaq family, who live north of the Arctic Circle; Standing Rock: People and Pride, an audio documentary by Kim Wheeler; Coyote’s Crazy Smart Science Show, a video game testing the mental might of the player; Impossible to Contain, a 360 video doc about the aftermath of a diesel spill in the waters of Bella Bella, BC; Purity & Decay, a video game utilizing the popular Telltale adventure game style; Thunderbird Strike, a 2D sidescroller game with the player flying from the Tar Sands to the Great Lakes as a thunderbird protecting Turtle Island; He Ao Kotahi, a web series featuring Māori artists in Palestine; and XINONA, a digital animation essay set in an alternative universe where planets are made of kale, kombucha and beer.

imagineNATIVE’s Art Crawl will include three different locations, showcasing eight exhibitions at seven different galleries. This year’s Art Crawl will begin at OCADU with two exhibitions: For This Land: Inside Elemental and raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000–2015). The Art Crawl will then move to the 401 Richmond building with five Exhibition Premieres including: Mourning and Mayhem: The work of Adrian Stimson at A Space Gallery; Channel 51: Igloolik – The Filmmaking Process, at Trinity Square Video; Skawennati: for the ages, at The Commons; Territ-Aur(i)al Imprints at Prefix Gallery; and Raven Chacon: Report at YYZ Artists’ Outlet. The evening will end with Installation Preview: Transmissions Part II at Wallace Studios, a behind-the-scenes preview of filmmaker Lisa Jackson’s first art exhibition Transmissions, as well as watching the filming of Unearthed, a live performance that will be a centrepiece of the installation.

imagineNATIVE’s FREE Industry Series, presented by CBC and CBC Docs, returns with leading professionals from around the world teaching and discussing topics relevant to Indigenous media creators. The Industry Series running October 19 to 21 will open with a launch and details of the new imagineNATIVE Institute, panels including topics surrounding Indigenous protocols in film and media, the first ever Web Series pitch competition, networking events, and a Sound Design Masterclass with Māori artist Dave Whitehead, with credits on major motion pictures and shows including District 9, The Hobbit, Arrival and Netflix’s Okja.

The full schedule for the 18th Annual imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival is now available online at imaginenative.org/calendar.”

-from ImagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival news release
Read imagineNATIVE’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Profile Highlight | Unceded Voices (Montréal)

As ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory grows, we realize that it’s a bit overwhelming to read through all of the profiles. We’re hoping that by occasionally highlighting some profiles on our blog, you may learn about an initiative that you may not have initially seen in the directory. Also, if you know of a Canadian community-engaged arts for social change initiative that isn’t in our directory, but should be, please let us know! We love and need your input/feedback in building this resource! -Lisa, Content Coordinator at ArtBridges.

Unceded Voices : Anticolonial Street Artists Performance is a biennial convergence of Indigenous-identified women/2spirit/Queer/ and women of color street artists in Tiohtià:ke, unceded Haudenosaunee territory (also known as Montreal)since 2014. The goal of this convergence is three-fold: to develop a network of solidarity and support between Indigenous women/2Spirit/Queer and women of color street artists ; to promote anticolonial resistance through diverse street art interventions; and to foster relationships and dialogue between the collective and the broader community.”

To read more about Unceded Voices, please see their profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Profile Highlight | Otahpiaaki (Calgary)

As ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory grows, we realize that it’s a bit overwhelming to read through all of the profiles. We’re hoping that by occasionally highlighting some profiles on our blog, you may learn about an initiative that you may not have initially seen in the directory. Also, if you know of a Canadian community-engaged arts for social change initiative that isn’t in our directory, but should be, please let us know! We love and need your input/feedback in building this resource! -Lisa, Content Coordinator at ArtBridges.

Otahpiaaki is a social innovation project based at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Canada. Each year, Otahpiaaki hosts our Indigenous Beauty, Fashion and Design Week, featuring some of our region’s most inspiring Indigenous artists, designers, and creatives. We believe that the work of reconciliation is for neighbours and that important conversations and teachings can be shared through creative and artistic practices.”

To read more about Otahpiaaki, please see their profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Seven Generations: Youth Reconciliation Project (Toronto)

“Please join 7th Generation Image Makers along with artists Animikii, Hannah S.Beaulieu, Lucia Laford, Jennifer Messon, Trevaun Robinson and Taylor Webster as we celebrate the opening of the photography exhibition Seven Generations: Youth Reconciliation Project.

Exhibition Opening will take place on Wednesday September 27th from 5-7PM with Artist Talks at 5:30PM in the Ada Slaight Gallery of OCAD Universtiy (100 McCaul Street, 2nd Floor).

This project has been supported through Native Child and Family Services of Toronto (NCFST), the Toronto Aboriginal Support Services Council (TASSC), and the Indigenous Visual Culture Student Centre of OCAD University.”

from Native Youth Resource Centre facebook

Public Art Call: Indigenous Art Project for the Faculty of Law

Queen’s Faculty of Law at Queen’s University invites Indigenous artists to submit qualifications for consideration to design, fabricate and install a permanent artwork for the Gowling WLG Atrium of the Faculty of Law, Queen’s University. This is a two-stage competition that will be assessed by a committee. Interested Indigenous artists who may not have previous experience creating a public art commission are encouraged to consider mentorship and artistic collaborations with other artists.

The project is part of the Faculty of Law’s response to further the objectives of the Calls to Action outlined by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, as well as the final report of Queen’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission Task Force. It is part of a greater initiative to increase the visibility of Indigenous art and culture and the recognition of Indigenous territory in spaces across the Queen’s University campus. The aim of this project is to create a welcoming space for Indigenous peoples in the Faculty of Law, and to help promote awareness around historical/contemporary issues relevant to Indigenous peoples and law.

Please see http://law.queensu.ca/indigenous-art-project for additional information and photos and a video of the atrium.”

-from Queens University website

Howling Moons – Presented by The Sweetgrass Sisters Collective (Sep 30, Hamilton)

“The Sweetgrass Sisters Collective is proud to present their inaugural event, Howling Moons, taking place Saturday, September 30th, 2017 in Hamilton, Ontario. Howling Moons is a curated celebration of Indigenous art, performance, teachings and culture.

Founded in January 2017 by Jasmin Glaw (Algonquin / German) and Jessica Lea Fleming (Métis / Scottish), The Sweetgrass Sisters Collective (TSSC) aims to connect communities, create opportunity for Indigenous expression and celebrate the beauty of Indigenous cultures.

With support from the Ontario Arts Council and the City of Hamilton Canada 150 Fund, The Sweetgrass Sisters Collective will present Hamilton’s first Howling Moons festival. Daytime programming will take place at the Fischer Gallery, Art Gallery of Hamilton from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., and will feature teachings from local Knowledge Keepers and Hoop Dance performance + Talking Circle with award winning dancer Nimkii Osawamick from Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory.

Admission to this event is free and includes light, traditional foods.
All ages welcome.

Facebook | Instagram: @sweetgrass_sisters_collective | Twitter: @TSSChamont”

-from The Sweetgrass Sisters Collective

Resource Highlight | Why the Caged Bird Sings: Radical Inclusivity, Sonic Survivance and the Collective Ownership of Freedom Songs + Tools

Why the Caged Bird Sings: Radical Inclusivity, Sonic Survivance and the Collective Ownership of Freedom Songs + Tools
OCADU | ON | 2015
Cheryl L’Hirondelle

“This thesis, by way of deep reflection and truthful recounting, pays homage to six different groups of predominately Indigenous incarcerated women and detained male youth, who engaged with me in an active process of collective songwriting and recording between 2008 and 2015. This inclusive creative process was designed to enable participants— who are at risk of having their voices, histories and identities erased—to participate in a life-­?affirming demonstration of their own self-­?expression by co-­?creating a song together. Indigenous Inquiry or Critical Indigenous Pedagogy (CIP) was the methodology utilized, in order to examine my motivations for wanting to discover and share what constitutes a ‘freedom song’. In doing so, this thesis shares specific knowledge I gained as a result of my lifelong dedication to furthering the dissemination of nêhiyawin (Cree Worldview), through my favourite mode of creative expression: song-­? writing. In addition to this written thesis, the original songs are included.”

Click through the ArtBridges Resource Portal to learn more.

The Rivers Speak Community Play (Sep. 6-16, Mississaugi First Nation Pow Wow Grounds)

The Rivers Have Always Spoken. It Is Time For Us To Listen.

A young French Canadian girl and Anishnaabe boy are growing up fast on the land and waters of Algoma in the 1940s.

On the banks of the Penewabekong Ziibii, Thunderbird Woman is preparing to make an offering to the water.

At the Wharncliffe Hall, the loggers are getting ready to host a square dance in celebration of the end of log run season.

Come hear an all-ages cast of community performers and Elders share these and other stories and teachings using local cultural, musical, and storytelling traditions and ceremony in eight magical performances at the Mississaugi First Nation Pow Wow Grounds.

You don’t want to miss this river journey of a lifetime!

The Rivers Speak
A Community Play
Created with and for the people of Central Algoma
From Genaabaajing to Bawating

September 6-9 and 13-16, 6pm 2017
Misswezhaging (Mississaugi First Nation) Pow Wow Grounds

Website: www.theriversspeak.com | Tickets

For more information, please visit the facebook event page.”

-submitted by Robin Sutherland
Read Thinking Rock Community Arts’ profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory & Map

Project Highlight: “Sky is the Limit” Documentary & Performance (All Nations Healin’ Thru the Artz)

All Nations Healin’ Thru Artz is a “non-profit community organization that links professional artists with inner-city youth in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada to collaboratively create and showcase performance based work and projects.” ANHTA shares with us a documentary and the entire performance of this year’s “Sky is the Limit” showcase in Regina, which was a roaring success. Watch the videos below and enjoy!

In the Fall, All Nations Healin’ Thru Artz will be celebrating their 10th anniversary, details forthcoming, but keep your eyes and ears open for what they have in store for their anniversary!

-submitted by All Nations Healin’ Thru Artz
Read All Nations Healin’ Thru Artz’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Wapikoni – Cinema on Wheels Tour Continues to Roll Across Canada

Wapikoni, Cinema On Wheels, showcasing stories made during Wapikoni stopovers rolls across Canada

“As part of Wapikoni Mobile’s first-ever coast-to-coast tour, Wapikoni: Cinema on Wheels will be stopping in various cities and communities across the country from April to November 2017 to bring a selection of incredible short films with compelling stories and incredible visuals directed by Indigenous youth from Eastern Canada to urban areas and remote communities. The Wapikoni, Cinema on Wheels tour is part of “Wapikoni From Coast to Coast: Reconciliation Through the Media Arts”, a project under the patronage of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and supported by the Government of Canada.

Cinema on Wheels offers three distinct programmes of shorts films that were selected in prestigious film festivals such as Sundance, the Toronto International Film Festival, the Montreal International Documentary Festival, the Cannes Film Market, etc.: the general public (14 shorts), the teen (10 shorts) and the youth 7-12 (8 shorts) programmes. Witness the flowering of a new generation of talented young Indigenous filmmakers, learn about other cultures and participate in a discussion about Indigenous films and realities with the projectionists-facilitators. The choice of these works, with their unique stories, is aimed at discovering dynamic Indigenous voices and incredible talents coming straight from the communities.

Don’t hesitate to contact Tanis Choueiri at diffusion@wapikoni.ca to book a FREE a screening in your community, school or to have the caravan stop at your festival!

CALENDAR OF UPCOMING DATES:

  • August 14 , 6pm: Toronto (Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, 16 Spadina corner of Bloor)
  • August 17, 11:30 am: Hiawatha First Nation (Youth Centre, 361 Hiawatha Line)
  • August 21, 12:30 pm: Alderville First Nation (Community Centre, 8913 Country Road 45, Roseneath, ON)
  • August 22, 7 pm: Peterborough (Nogojiwanong Friendship Centre, 580 Cameron Street)
  • August 24, 11:30 am: Moose Deer Point Rec Center (1011 Ogemawahj Rd.)
  • September 9: Rideau Hall, Ottawa
  • September 15: Montréal
  • September 16: Festival de cinéma de la ville de Québec
  • We are currently booking more dates and taking reservations. Our calendar is updated daily.

“Through the project ‘Wapikoni from Coast to Coast: Building Bridges and Reconciliation through Media Arts’, young Indigenous Canadians will have the opportunity to be heard and to exchange ideas. The audiovisual and musical creative workshops will give young creators the chance to express themselves, and the resulting works will be presented in several communities across the country. Let’s take advantage of the 150th anniversary of Confederation to have a positive dialogue and to strengthen relations between us all,” said the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage.

From April to November, a caravan equipped with exterior projection equipment and staffed by two facilitators will travel west to east, covering 10 Canadian provinces and stopping in 100 Indigenous
communities and 50 cities. The screenings will be in English, French and Indigenous languages.

We have 3 programmes:
– general public (14 shorts)
– teen (10 shorts)
– youth 7-12 (8 shorts)

“One of Wapikoni’s most cherished dreams has come true: Making the voices of Indigenous youth who we have worked with for over 13 years echo throughout Canada, establishing a dialogue between communities of all origins through their films. These works are a unique part of Indigenous cultural heritage,” says Manon Barbeau, Executive Director of Wapikoni.

“We believe in the power of film to affect change. That’s why a program like Wapikoni, Cinema on Wheels is so important. It helps amplify the voices of these emerging Indigenous creators,” says Jacqueline Dupuis, Executive Director of VIFF. “We believe in supporting the talent that exists here in Canada and are always on the lookout for good stories and innovative ways of creating them. We are honoured to partner with Wapikoni in sharing the often unheard stories created by Indigenous youth across Canada.”

About Wapikoni
Wapikoni Mobile is a travelling audiovisual and musical creation studio dedicated to Indigenous youth. Since 2004, Wapikoni has visited over 20 communities and accompanied thousands of participants who worked to direct close to 1,000 short films translated into several languages. These films have received 146 awards and honours at national and international festivals. Wapikoni is under the patronage of UNESCO.”

-from Wapikoni Mobile website
Read Wapikoni’s profile in ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map