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Posts Tagged ‘reconciliation’

‘Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way’ Tour (Vancouver Moving Theatre)

“It’s finally happening!! After many years of listening, writing, visiting partnering communities and fundraising Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way is now ready to tour across Turtle Island/Canada.

And it’s starting on Coast Salish territory at the Vancouver Aboriginal Friendship Centre May 17-27, 2018.

Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way is a new play and cultural encounter that brings to life the story of Old One and his journey to reconcile with himself, his family and his community.

Woven around indigenous storytelling and cultural teachings, Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way is co-written by award-winning artists Renae Morriseau (Saulteaux Cree) with Rosemary Georgeson (Coast Salish/Sahtu Dene) and Savannah Walling (American Canadian). It is also enriched by contributions from the cast, knowledge-keepers and partnering communities.

Click on the video link above to watch Renae, Savannah and cast members talk about what this project means to them!

Although we are well on our way to production, we are still raising funds for a few select, yet vital aspects to the project like food for cultural gatherings, mentorship fees for youth, and ceremonial gifts for each community we visit along the tour: donation page.”

-from Vancouver Moving Theatre newsletter

Courage Lab: Arts & Equity Workshop Series – Strawberry Moon Teachings, July 7 (Toronto)

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“Courage Lab : Arts & Equity Workshop Series
‘Strawberry Moon Teachings’
THURSDAY JULY 7, 2016
5:30-9:00PM
SKETCH 180 Shaw St.
Lower level

Join diverse artists, educators, organizers and activists to courageously investigate, share and experiment with concepts, ideas, tools and practices exploring equity, reconciliation and anti-oppression through the arts!

Members of the Anishnawbe Wellness Collective will lead the group in an opening and closing prayer and circle smudge, strawberry moon teachings on forgiveness, followed by creative reflection activities lead by SKETCH staff and guest artist facilitators.

The Courage Lab series builds on the on going Emergence partnership initiative lead by SKETCH and Neighbourhood Arts Network, focused on making space to investigate creative practices for leading social change in Toronto’s arts communities.

Anishnawbe Wellness Collective – this new pilot project is Aboriginal run and open to the community with priority given to Aboriginal, Metis and Inuit with a focus on community members gathering to cook nutritional meals, share economical knowledge and education information around food and nutrition utilizing a traditional framework. There is a large Aboriginal community in the Weston and Mount Dennis neighbourhoods, and this project aims to provide community members a chance to connect and share information about healthy food.

Food will be provided
Wheelchair Accessible
Scent free environment

REGISTER TODAY!
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/courage-lab-strawberry-moon-teachings-tickets-26305072179

Visit the Facebook event page here:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1562064057422178/

Posted with permission from Ella Cooper
Visit SKETCH’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map
Visit Neighbourhood Arts Network’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

{Re}conciliation: Funding program promotes artistic collaborations between Indigenous & non-Indigenous artists

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“A groundbreaking initiative which aims to promote artistic collaborations that look to the past & future for new dialogues between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

The Canada Council administers the {Re}conciliation initiative, which was developed by Canada Council, the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada in anticipation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission‘s final report and recommendations. It aims to promote artistic collaborations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, investing in the power of art and imagination to inspire dialogue, understanding and change.

This initiative is open to First Nations, Inuit and Métis artists, collectives and arts organizations (including collaborations with non- Aboriginal artists and organizations) who are invited to submit proposals for project funding up to $75 000. Applicants who submitted a proposal in the past but did not receive funding are eligible to re-submit to future competitions.

Six projects were selected following the first competition in May 2015. A second competition is currently underway. The deadline to apply is 21 June 2016.”

***Click here for more information***

Posted with permission from Ashley Tardif-Bennett, Canada Council for the Arts

Courage Lab: Cultivating Self Care & Compassion through an Indigenous Lens, April 21 (Toronto)

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Courage Lab: Arts & Equity Workshop Series – ‘Cultivating Self Care & Compassion through an Indigenous Lens’

Thursday, April 21st, 2016 | 5:30-9:00pm
SKETCH Working Arts | 180 Shaw Street, lower level, Toronto, Ontario M6J 2W5

Hosted by SKETCH and the Neighbourhood Arts Network
Facilitated by Special Guests Malikah Awe:ri and Gein Wong, with support from SKETCH & Neighbourhood Arts Network team.
Virtual guest ArtBridges

Join diverse artists, educators, organizers and activists to courageously investigate, share and experiment with concepts, ideas, tools and practices exploring equity, reconciliation and anti-oppression through the arts! The Courage Lab series builds on the on going Emergence Partnership Initiative lead by SKETCH and Neighbourhood Arts Network, focused on making space to investigate creative practices for leading social change in Toronto’s arts communities.

Food will be provided!
Wheelchair Accessible.
Scent free environment.
Option to attend virtually via Google Hangout Group facilitated by ArtBridges.

Description:
In this introductory session Mahlikah Awe:ri and Gein Wong invite you to unpack the process of your practise from a lens of humility while exploring topics such as: Demystifying Reconciliation; the Corporatization of land and our relationship to the land; Decolonizing one’s self and how it translates to your art practise; Mindful decision making from a seven generation mindset. This will be an interactive workshop incorporating performance, breakout groups, discussion and activities. Come with open hearts and minds.

Register today! https://couragelab2016.eventbrite.ca/

For more information, visit the event page on Facebook.

Submitted by Ella Cooper

National Arts Centre: Spotlight on Indigenous Storytelling & Reconciliation (Ottawa)

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“As the New Year begins, the National Arts Centre is getting ready to showcase Indigenous storytelling and reconciliation on its stages. Here are some highlights:

I Lost My Talk World Premiere
One of the highlights of the NAC’s Indigenous showcase will be the January 14-15 world premiere of I Lost My Talk, composed by John Estacio and performed in Southam Hall by the NAC Orchestra under the direction of NAC Music Director Alexander Shelley. This immersive, multidisciplinary work – based on the poem by Mi’kmaw elder and poet Rita Joe – was commissioned for the NAC Orchestra to commemorate the 75th birthday of The Right Honourable Joe Clark by his family.

Rita Joe penned her poem to express not only the pain and suffering of her experience at Schubenacadie Residential School in Nova Scotia, but also her hope and conviction that her voice could guide and inspire indigenous and non-indigenous peoples across Canada to journey to a place of strength and healing. Moved by Rita Joe’s message of peaceful reconciliation, Alexander Shelley and Creative Producer and Director Donna Feore conceived of the idea to share Joe’s powerful message in a unique symphonic experience that combines music, motion and film.

The performance will include a film by world-renowned director Barbara Willis Sweete, featuring 10 First Nations dancers moving to choreography created by Santee Smith of the Kahnyen’kehàka Nation, Turtle Clan from Six Nations of the Grand River, Ontario.

Shot on the majestic shores of Georgian Bay, Ontario, this beautifully rendered film will be projected on to screens surrounding the orchestra, designed and operated by the exceptionally talented visual design team of Turbine Studios from Montreal. The poem will be narrated by Guna and Rappahannock actor Monique Mojica as the NAC Orchestra performs Estacio’s lush and moving score.

Indigenous Events To Kick Off 2016

A Tribe Called Red – January 9
Kicking off the New Year on January 9 in the NAC foyer, NAC Presents will showcase the incredible A Tribe Called Red as part of its fifth anniversary bash. The band – whose music is the soundtrack to a contemporary evolution of the pow wow – has become the face of an urban Indigenous youth renaissance, championing their heritage and speaking out on Indigenous issues, while being on top of popular music, fashion and art.

Rita Joe Song Project – January 13
On January 13 in the NAC Fourth Stage, the NAC is launching the Rita Joe Song Project, a dynamic music initiative featuring young Indigenous youth from across Canada recording and performing unique songs inspired by Rita Joe poems.

Jack Charles V The Crown – January 14 to 16
Opening on January 14 and running until January 16 in the NAC Studio is English Theatre’s presentation of Jack Charles V The Crown, a highly entertaining autobiographical presentation from Australian living legend Jack Charles, whose experience as a stolen child echoes the plight of Canada’s own Indigenous people.

100 Years of Loss – January 14 to 30
From January 14 to 30 in the NAC foyer is the eye- opening exhibition 100 Years of Loss which raises awareness about the legacy of residential schools. Also on January 14, the NAC is hosting a timely panel discussion in the Panorama Room on art in the context of reconciliation moderated by Dr. Marie Wilson, Commissioner, Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and featuring panelists Rachael Maza, acclaimed Australian theatre director of Jack Charles V The Crown, Joseph Boyden, author of the award-winning novels Three Day Road and The Orenda, and composer John Estacio. The panel discussion, which is live streamed at nac-cna.ca/live, is being introduced by Joe Clark.

Going Home Star – Truth and Reconciliation – January 28 to 30
From January 28 to 30 in Southam Hall, NAC Dance presents Going Home Star – Truth and Reconciliation, a new commission by Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet choreographed by Mark Godden in a story written by author Joseph Boyden. This powerfully emotional ballet tells the love story of Annie and Gordon, a pair of contemporary Aboriginal young people coming to terms with a soul-destroying past.

Florent Vollant – January 30
On January 30, NAC Presents brings to the Fourth Stage Innu author, composer and singer Florent Vollant, formely of Kashtin, the beloved musical duo which performed all over the world.

Moonlodge – February 12 and 13
Finally, on February 12 and 13, NAC English Theatre brings to the Fourth Stage Moonlodge, a classic of Indigenous Canadian theatre by playwright Margo Kane, in preparation for a major revival. This presentation is directed by 2014/15 NAC Artist in residence Corey Payette and features 2015/16 NAC Ensemble member Paula-Jean Prudat.

Follow the NAC on Twitter @CanadasNAC and find us on Facebook.
Join the conversation #ARNAC.”

Posted with permission from Carl Martin, Senior Advisor, Communication / Conseiller principal, Communications
Photo courtesy of the National Arts Centre

Canada Council for the Arts: Six new arts projects by Aboriginal artists will explore conciliation & reconciliation

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“Ottawa, November 3, 2015 The Canada Council for the Arts, the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada (The Circle) today announced the six arts projects that will be funded through the organizations’ first {Re}conciliation initiative. The partners also announced their plans to renew joint funding to this initiative for a minimum of two years. A new call for proposals will be issued in 2016.

The inaugural {Re}conciliation projects – selected by a Canada Council jury of peers – will be presented in communities across the country beginning in the fall of 2016. Ranging from animated and documentary films, to site-specific performance work, to bead and dialogue workshops, to community-based and interactive storytelling projects, they address in unique and provocative ways the ongoing need for conciliation and reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples of Canada.

The selected projects are:

This is What I Wish You Knew – ​Mi’kmaw Native Friendship Centre (Halifax, Nova Scotia)

Reconciliation Film Project – First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada & Productions Cazabon (Ottawa, Ontario)

Nattilik (Netsilik) art exhibition by the Gjoa Haven, Nunavut community about the impact of the residential school period on the Inuit – Nattilik Heritage Society (Gjoa Haven, Nunavut)

#callresponse – Collective Tarah Hogue, Maria Hupfield and Tania Willard (grunt gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia) with Christi Belcourt, Ursula Johnson and Laakkuluk Williamson-Bathory

Project Charlie – Terril Calder, Joseph Boyden, Jason Ryle, Geeta Sondhi (Toronto, Ontario)

Opening the Doors to Dialogue – Samuel Thomas (Niagara Falls, Ontario)

Quotes:
“More and more Canadians understand that Reconciliation is one of the defining issues of our time. Conciliation and reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples of this land are an essential part of our journey forward, if we are to be a country that truly embraces and upholds the values of dignity, justice and trust. Indigenous artists must be at the centre of that journey, and we must support them. They can help us remember and address our shared and difficult history, as well as imagine the potential of our common future. The Canada Council is proud to support some of this vital work through {Re}conciliation. I’m also delighted to confirm that we will be joining our partners in renewing our support for this initiative for two more years.”
Simon Brault, Director and CEO, Canada Council for the Arts

“These artists are at the forefront of what we hope will be a new and vital cultural movement in Canada – a growing network of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal artists who are committed to working together to promote a better understanding of the wrongs of our colonial past, the dimensions of current injustices, as well as a shared exploration of a more enlightened path forward.”
Stephen Huddart, President and CEO of the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation

“The Circle plays a unique convening role, and Reconciliation in a post TRC Canada is at the heart of our work with philanthropic partners and Indigenous communities. We are honoured to play a role in the collaboration with Canada Council and the J.W. McConnell Foundation. Our best wishes to the artists in their process of creation.”
Wanda Brascoupé Peters, Executive Director, The Circle

About {Re}conciliation:
This initiative aims to promote artistic collaborations between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal artists, investing in the power of art and imagination to inspire dialogue, understanding and change. The Canada Council administers the {Re}conciliation initiative, which was developed by Canada Council, the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and The Circle in anticipation of the  Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report and recommendations. A first call for proposals was issued in May 2015. A second will be issued in 2016. Interested artists and arts organizations will be invited to submit proposals for project funding up to $75,000. Applicants who submitted a proposal in 2015 but did not receive funding are eligible to re-submit to future deadlines.”

Posted with permission from Heather McAfee, Public Relations Advisor, Canada Council for the Arts

From the Heart: How 100 Canadians Created an Unconventional Theatre Performance about Reconciliation (Victoria, BC)

'Labyrinth View' / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

“In the summer of 2013, one hundred Canadians in Victoria, British Columbia used theatre as a way to consider what it will take to reshape our country’s relationship with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people. From the Heart: enter into the journey of reconciliation was a interactive performance that invited eight people at a time to find their own way through the alcoves and chambers of a vast indoor labyrinth built from salvaged doors and windows, trees, and hundreds of meters of fabric. Along a journey lit by paper lanterns, the audience discovered a culturally diverse, inter-generational cast of community performers presenting songs, scenes, and art installations — all inspired by stories that had deepened their personal understanding of the lived experience of Indigenous people in Canada and the legacy of colonization. Director Will Weigler explains, “We welcomed audiences to be witness to stories from the performers’ own experience and from our country’s past that had moved them — stories that were very present and alive for us right now, as non-Native people in the 21st century.”

In his new book From the Heart: How 100 Canadians Created an Unconventional Theatre Performance about Reconciliation, Weigler tells the story of how the show was developed and what it was like in performance with detailed explanations of each step of the process, fully illustrated with photos and drawings. For those with an interest in reconciliation, this book offers a gripping example of how theatre can contribute to public dialogue in a creative and vital way. Community groups will be able to use the book as a model to create their own unique production of From the Heart based on the pilot project.”

For more information about From the Heart, visit www.from-the-heart.ca. To order your copy of the book, visit Strong Nations Publishing, or you may read the book online line HERE (click on the diagonal arrows lower right to see the full pages).

Posted with permission from Will Weigler

'Too Big to Touch' featuring Kailee Gow & Anna Tran / Photo credit: Peter C. Campbell (Screen capture of video recording)

Kailee Gow & Anna Tran / Photo credit: Peter C. Campbell (Screen capture of video recording)

'At Table' featuring Will Weigler / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

Will Weigler / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

'At Table 2' featuring Christine Sheu, Margot Johnston & Will Weigler / Photo credit: Peter C. Campbell (Screen capture of video recording)

Christine Sheu, Margot Johnston & Will Weigler / Photo credit: Peter C. Campbell (Screen capture of video recording)

'Drumming of the Facts' / Installation by Katrina Brown & Loreena Sandor

Installation by Katrina Brown & Loreena Sandor

'Entangled' featuring Jeff Shultis / Photo credit: Peter C. Campbell (Screen capture of video recording)

Jeff Shultis / Photo credit: Peter C. Campbell (Screen capture of video recording)

'Imagine' featuring Zi Yuan / Photo credit: Peter C. Campbell (Screen capture of video recording)

Zi Yuan / Photo credit: Peter C. Campbell (Screen capture of video recording)

'Head to Heart' featuring Patty Blumel & Odette Laramee / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

Patty Blumel & Odette Laramee / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

'Charlie' featuring Jazelin Maskos / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

Jazelin Maskos / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

'Answerizing' featuring Romina Miranda, Liz Bean & Renée Livernoche / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

Romina Miranda, Liz Bean & Renée Livernoche / Photo credit: Ilya Stavitsky

'Labyrinth' / Axometric Sketch by Mark Lakeman

Axometric Sketch by Mark Lakeman

Witness Blanket: Traveling large scale art installation recognizes the Indian Residential School era

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“The blanket is a universal symbol of protection. For many of us, it identifies who we are and where we’re from – we wear them in ceremony and give them as gifts. Blankets protect our young and comfort our elders.

Inspired by a woven blanket, we have created a large scale art installation, made out of hundreds of items reclaimed from Residential Schools, churches, government buildings and traditional and cultural structures including Friendship Centres, band offices, treatment centres and universities, from across Canada. The Witness Blanket stands as a national monument to recognise the atrocities of the Indian Residential School era, honour the children, and symbolise ongoing reconciliation.

Inspiration for the Project:
Strewn in the wake of the Indian Residential Schools are an immeasurable number of broken or damaged pieces. These fragmented cultures, crumbling buildings, segments of language, and grains of diminished pride are often connected only by the common experience that created them. Imagine those pieces, symbolic and tangible, woven together in the form of a blanket. A blanket made from pieces of residential schools, churches, government buildings, and cultural structures.

A blanket where the story of each piece is as important to its construction as the wood and screws that hold it together.

A blanket with the sole purpose of standing in eternal witness to the effects of the Indian Residential School era – the system created and run by churches and the Canadian government to “take the Indian out of the child”. Left alone, these pieces may be forgotten, lost, buried, or worse – be uncomfortable reminders that leave painful impressions on the minds and hearts of those who recognize what they represent. Individually, they are paragraphs of a disappearing narrative. Together they are strong and formidable, collectively able to recount for future generations the true story of loss, strength, reconciliation and pride.
– Artist Carey Newman (Ha-yalth-kingeme)

Click here to read a speech by Carey Newman (Ha-yalth-kingeme)

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If you’d like to get involved with the project, there are three ways:
1. SHARE – Spread the word about the project, or share your story with us.
2. CHAMPION – Help us bring the Witness Blanket to your community.
3. GIVE – Click here to financially support the Witness Blanket project.

We are currently in the planning stages for a National Tour of the Witness Blanket. Please click here to download our Call for Expressions of Interest for venues, communities, organizations etc. who would like to exhibit the Blanket. For any questions regarding the National Tour, please contact us by email info@witnessblanket.ca or phone 1-855-888-6998.

Upcoming Tour Dates:

  • Hamilton Public Library, Hamilton, ON:July 13 – August 29, 2015
  • Nova Scotia: September, October, November 2015
  • Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Winnipeg, MB: January – June 2016
  • Peace River Museum, Peace River, AB: July and August, 2016
  • Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, BC: September, October and November, 2016
  • New Westminster Museum and Archives, New Westminster, BC: December 2016 – April 2017

*** With tentative bookings throughout 2020

Visit http://witnessblanket.ca/ for more info. 

Posted with permission from Carey Newman (Ha-yalth-kingeme)

{Re}conciliation: Call for proposals to create new artworks reflecting the conciliation and reconciliation experience in Canada, Deadline July 24

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A groundbreaking arts partnership looks to the past & future for new dialogues between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples in Canada

The Canada Council for the Arts, the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada (The Circle) today announced the launch of a new, cross-sector funding partnership to support artistic projects that explore the ongoing process of conciliation and reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

About {Re}conciliation:
This unique initiative will promote artistic collaborations between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal artists, investing in the power of art and imagination to inspire dialogue, understanding and change. Council will administer the {Re}conciliation initiative. A call for proposals will be issued in late May 2015. Interested artists and arts organizations will be invited to submit proposals for project funding up to $75,000. This initiative precedes the release of the much-anticipated report from Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and seeks to help artists and Canadians alike reflect upon, and help repair historic injustices.

The partnership also highlights Council’s recent commitment to building a vital and engaged new Aboriginal program as part of the upcoming transformation of its national arts funding programs.

Quotes:
“Reconciliation between Aboriginal peoples of this country and non-Aboriginal Canadians is a defining issue for the future of our country,” said Canada Council Director and CEO, Simon Brault. “We not only believe that the arts can bring greater understanding to the issue and will highlight the unique voices of Canada’s Indigenous artists, but also lead to new and constructive dialogues on justice and healing.”

“The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s historic work offers Canada an opportunity to reshape relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples. Philanthropy and the arts have important roles to play in supporting creative collaboration in forging a culture of respect and reciprocity,” said Stephen Huddart, President and CEO of the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation.

“Reconciliation in Canada is a process in its infancy, and will need to continue for many years. It will be collaborations, partnerships and individuals working in all fields – committed to the process, which keep the issues before the Canadian public – that will eventually lead to systemic change. In that spirit, it is an honour and a privilege to be part of this collaboration alongside the Canada Council and the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation,” said Victoria Grant, Chair, The Circle.

Canada Council for the Arts
The Canada Council for the Arts is Canada’s national public arts funder. We champion and invest in artistic excellence so that Canadians may enjoy and participate in a rich cultural life. In 2013-14 we allocated $153.6 million dollars towards artistic creation and innovation through our grants, prizes and payments. We also conduct research, convene activities and work with partners to advance the sector and help embed the arts more deeply in communities across the country. We are responsible for the Canadian Commission for UNESCO which promotes the values and programs of UNESCO to contribute to a more peaceful, equitable and sustainable future for Canadians. The Canada Council Art Bank operates art rental programs and helps further public engagement with contemporary arts.

The J.W. McConnell Family Foundation
Established in 1937, the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation engages Canadians in building a more innovative, inclusive, sustainable, and resilient society. The Foundation’s purpose is to enhance Canada’s ability to address complex social, environmental and economic challenges. We accomplish this by developing, testing, and applying innovative approaches and solutions; by strengthening the community sector; and by collaborating with partners in the community, private, and public sectors.

The Circle
The Circle is an open network to promote giving, sharing, and philanthropy in Aboriginal communities across the country. We connect with and support the empowerment of First Nations, Inuit and Métis nations, communities, and individuals in building a stronger, healthier future.”

*** CLICK HERE FOR FUNDING GUIDELINES ***

Posted with permission from Heather McAfee, Canada Council for the Arts