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Posts Tagged ‘resource’

Resource Highlight | Choreographic Play: Investigating Dynamic Choreographic Engagement with all Bodies

Choreographic Play: Investigating Dynamic Choreographic Engagement with all Bodies
York University | ON | 2016
Michelle Ann Silagy

“Choreographic Play: Investigating Dynamic Choreographic Engagement with all Bodies is informed by the burgeoning trend to include multi-ability bodies in the practice of contemporary dance. An important aspect of this research addresses inclusivity whereby improvisational methods and choreographic processes can be infused within communities comprised of all abilities of all populations of people. The goal of my research has been to originate improvisational and choreographic processes and choreography that can be experienced and understood by all who take part in it. This research considered ways to share both processes and performative aspects of choreography by utilizing a practice-based methodology in the creation of three choreographic case studies. These are, first the I Am solo project entitled at the end of a stem, second, a self-produced project (RE)Trace and finally, Snowlight. These case studies represent the containers where activated investigations are magnified and/or realized.”

Click through the ArtBridges Resource Portal to learn more.

Resource Highlight | Why the Caged Bird Sings: Radical Inclusivity, Sonic Survivance and the Collective Ownership of Freedom Songs + Tools

Why the Caged Bird Sings: Radical Inclusivity, Sonic Survivance and the Collective Ownership of Freedom Songs + Tools
OCADU | ON | 2015
Cheryl L’Hirondelle

“This thesis, by way of deep reflection and truthful recounting, pays homage to six different groups of predominately Indigenous incarcerated women and detained male youth, who engaged with me in an active process of collective songwriting and recording between 2008 and 2015. This inclusive creative process was designed to enable participants— who are at risk of having their voices, histories and identities erased—to participate in a life-­?affirming demonstration of their own self-­?expression by co-­?creating a song together. Indigenous Inquiry or Critical Indigenous Pedagogy (CIP) was the methodology utilized, in order to examine my motivations for wanting to discover and share what constitutes a ‘freedom song’. In doing so, this thesis shares specific knowledge I gained as a result of my lifelong dedication to furthering the dissemination of nêhiyawin (Cree Worldview), through my favourite mode of creative expression: song-­? writing. In addition to this written thesis, the original songs are included.”

Click through the ArtBridges Resource Portal to learn more.

Project Highlight: “Sky is the Limit” Documentary & Performance (All Nations Healin’ Thru the Artz)

All Nations Healin’ Thru Artz is a “non-profit community organization that links professional artists with inner-city youth in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada to collaboratively create and showcase performance based work and projects.” ANHTA shares with us a documentary and the entire performance of this year’s “Sky is the Limit” showcase in Regina, which was a roaring success. Watch the videos below and enjoy!

In the Fall, All Nations Healin’ Thru Artz will be celebrating their 10th anniversary, details forthcoming, but keep your eyes and ears open for what they have in store for their anniversary!

-submitted by All Nations Healin’ Thru Artz
Read All Nations Healin’ Thru Artz’s profile on ArtBridges’ Community-Engaged Arts Directory and Map

Rapport : Impressions de l’impact des arts sur la qualité de vie et le bien-être en Ontario (Conseil des arts de l’Ontario, Nanos Research)

“Une nouvelle étude du Conseil des arts de l’Ontario (CAO) réalisée par Nanos Research révèle que les habitants de la province reconnaissent la contribution importante des arts au dynamisme et à la viabilité des collectivités.

Selon Impressions de l’impact des arts sur la qualité de vie et le bien-être en Ontario, rapport de Nanos Research fondé sur un sondage aléatoire de 1 004 personnes, une vaste majorité d’Ontariens est d’avis que les arts contribuent aux différents éléments qui déterminent la qualité de vie et le bien-être d’une collectivité. La recherche montre aussi à quel point cette opinion est ancrée chez les Ontariens

Points saillants de l’enquête

Les arts et la qualité de vie

  • 93 % des Ontariens sont d’avis que les activités artistiques contribuent à enrichir la qualité de notre vie.
  • 90 % des Ontariens affirment que les arts sont importants pour améliorer la qualité de vie dans leur collectivité.
  • 85 % déclarent que les arts sont importants pour améliorer la qualité de leur propre vie.

Les arts, l’identité et l’appartenance

  • 91 % des Ontariens sont d’avis que les arts nous aident à mieux comprendre les autres cultures.
  • 88 % sont d’avis que la participation à des activités artistiques construit un sentiment d’appartenance à sa communauté.

Les arts et le bien-être collectif

  • 90 % estiment qu’une scène artistique locale et active aide la communauté à devenir un meilleur endroit où vivre.
  • 97 % estiment qu’engager les enfants dans les arts est important pour leur développement global.
  • 80 % des Ontariens estiment qu’une scène artistique locale et active aide la communauté à attirer des entreprises.

Investissement public dans les arts

  • 82 % des Ontariens estiment qu’aider à rendre les arts disponibles aux gens de l’Ontario est un investissement important du gouvernement.
  • 79 % estiment que le gouvernement devrait dépenser des fonds publics pour investir dans les arts.

Opinion positive à l’endroit des arts dans toutes les régions et dans tous les groupes démographiques

L’enquête montre aussi qu’une majorité d’Ontariens, indépendamment de la région, du sexe et de l’âge, ont une opinion positive à l’endroit des arts et de tous les aspects suivants : qualité de la vie, bien-être collectif, identité et appartenance, investissement du gouvernement.”

Pour lire le rapport complet, visitez le site du Conseil des arts de l’Ontario.

-source : Conseil des arts de l’Ontario

Report: Impressions of the Impact of the Arts on Quality of Life and Well-Being in Ontario (Ontario Arts Council, Nanos Research)

“A new Ontario Arts Council (OAC) study conducted by Nanos Research shows that Ontario residents recognize the important contribution of the arts to vibrant, livable communities.

Impressions of the Impact of the Arts on Quality of Life and Well-Being in Ontario, the Nanos Research report based on a random survey of 1,004 individuals, found that a large majority of Ontarians agree that the arts contribute to the various elements of quality of life and community well-being. The research also demonstrated how strongly these views are held by Ontarians.

Survey Highlights

Arts and quality of life

  • 93% of Ontarians agree that arts activities help enrich the quality of our lives.
  • 90% of Ontarians say that the arts are important to improving the quality of life in their communities.
  • 85% say that the arts are important to improving the quality of their own lives.

Arts and identity and belonging

  • 91% of Ontarians agree that the arts help us to understand other cultures better.
  • 88% agree that participating in arts activities builds a shared sense of community identity.

Arts and community well-being

  • 90% agree that an active local arts scene helps make a community a better place to live.
  • 97% agree that engaging children in the arts is important to their overall development.
  • 80% of Ontarians agree that an active local arts scene helps communities attract businesses.

Government investment in the arts

  • 82% of Ontarians agree that helping make the arts available to people in Ontario is an important government investment.
  • 79% agree that government should spend public dollars to invest in the arts.

Positive views toward the arts across all regions and demographic groups

The survey also shows that regardless of the respondent’s region, gender and age, a majority of Ontarians had positive views about the arts and all of the following aspects: quality of life, community well-being, identity and belonging, and government investment.”

For more information and to read the full report, please visit Ontario Arts Council’s website.

-from Ontario Arts Council

ArtBridges Tips & Tools Series #6: Top Five Tips for Building an Inclusive Community Gallery

ArtBridges spoke with Dayna Rainville of the Arts Council of Algoma about the Miinikaan Project, and starting the community arts gallery, Dawaa Dazhi Gallery. Dayna’s tips touch on building relationships first, being responsive to her community, and keeping a sense of humour.

Dayna Rainville is a member of Missanabie Cree First Nation and the Community Project Coordinator, who curates the Dawaa Dazhi Gallery at the Algoma Arts Council situated at 369 Queen Street East in Sault Ste. Marie.  Dawaa Dazhi is Anishinaabemowin for ‘there is space in this place.’  The Dawaa Dazhi Gallery was created through The Miinikaan Project – a project funded with an Ontario Trillium Foundation Seed Grant.  Miinikaan means seed in Anishinaabemowin. We talked about building and keeping relationships, balancing multiple roles.

Here’s an excerpt:

  1. CREATING A COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE

“Whether you are an established artist, just starting out, or not sure if you really want to pursue a career in the arts, the Dawaa Dazhi Gallery welcomes people at all levels. The gallery is a place where people can practice, experiment, and fail without a high amount of risk. Four artists are featured a month, and the gallery works on a first come first serve basis.  There is no age or demographic barrier, people as young as ten have pitched their ideas and been welcomed into the gallery as if they were a professional artist who had been exhibiting for years.  For organizations interested in creating a community gallery it is important to create a place for practice, peer mentorship, and experimentation! Dayna’s tips are to hit the streets, meet people face to face, and don’t be scared to ask for help with social media.”

Click here for the full ArtBridges Tips & Tools: Top Five Tips for Building an Inclusive Community Gallery. For more FREE resources and tools like this, please visit the ArtBridges Resource Portal or reach us at info@artbridges.ca.

The ArtBridges Tips & Tools Series is funded by the Ontario Trillium Foundation and translated with support from the Department of Canadian Heritage Interpretation and Translation grant.

Resource Highlight | Arts Equity Video Series: Principle #2, Reflexivity & Relationships

Arts Equity Video Series: Principle #2, Reflexivity & Relationships
Neighbourhood Arts Network | ON | 2017

“The 2nd video in a series of 5 speaks to how reflexivity and relationships starts with critical self-reflection; reflecting on how our own position fits with those we aim to work with. This sort of reflection helps when working to build and maintain relationships.

Visit this page to access the accompanying worksheet for this video and the rest of videos from the rest of the Arts Equity series.

Video by: Meredith Stapon

Meredith Stapon is a creative force and recent graduate from York University. Following her Connecticut upbringing, Meredith returned home to Toronto, where she has found inspiration in the arts community. With experience throughout multiple disciplines, she currently finds peace combining traditional approaches with contemporary technologies.”

Click through the ArtBridges Resource Portal to learn more.

Resource Highlight | Arts Equity Video Series: Principle #1, Flexibility & Adaptability

Arts Equity Video Series: Principle #1, Flexibility & Adaptability
Neighbourhood Arts Network | ON | 2017

“”In this 1st video in a series of 5, learn about how flexibility and adaptability as an overarching principle to applying an arts & equity lens in your work and creative practice.

Visit this page to access the accompanying worksheet for this video and the rest of videos from the rest of the Arts Equity series.

Video by: Meredith Stapon

Meredith Stapon is a creative force and recent graduate from York University. Following her Connecticut upbringing, Meredith returned home to Toronto, where she has found inspiration in the arts community. With experience throughout multiple disciplines, she currently finds peace combining traditional approaches with contemporary technologies.”

Click through the ArtBridges Resource Portal to learn more.

Resource Highlight | Indigenous Arts Protocols (Ontario Arts Council)

Indigenous Arts Protocols
Ontario Arts Council | ON | 2016

“This video was created by the Ontario Arts Council as a tool to highlight the significance of Indigenous cultural protocols in the arts.

The Ontario Arts Council commissioned Maaiingan Productions, a First Nations video production company, to create this resource. Indigenous artists, academics, Elders and cultural leaders were interviewed about the importance of protocols, to present a clear understanding of the responsibility that comes with cultural practices, and ways to honour the guiding principles of protocols.”

Click through the ArtBridges Resource Portal to learn more.

Resource Highlight | Framing Community – A Community-Engaged Art Workbook (Ontario Arts Council)

Framing Community – A Community-Engaged Art Workbook
Ontario Arts Council | ON | 2017

Framing Community – A Community-Engaged Art Workbook provides guidance on how to develop projects and points to resources, references and funding sources and offers examples of recent artist-led projects in the province. It is the new version of an earlier workbook, Another Vital Link, published in 1998. Community-engaged artist, educator and consultant Maggie Hutcheson was commissioned to look at how the practice, its principles and processes have evolved in Ontario over the past 20 years.”

Click through the ArtBridges Resource Portal to learn more.